Worst Movies of All Time: These Films Got 0 Percent on Rotten Tomatoes

If you didn't have the opportunity to see these turkeys at the cinema, who knows—maybe a cult re-release isn't far away.
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Worst Movies of All Time: These Films Got 0 Percent on Rotten Tomatoes Warner Bros

Some movies succeed through their own failure. When The Room was released in 2003—written, directed, produced by and starring the now-infamous Tommy Wiseau—it was panned by critics and never left Los Angeles. A box-office gross of $1,800 in the first fortnight meant it was pulled from further circulation. The production budget was $6 million—every penny of it seemingly wasted.

Yet in 2017, almost 15 years after its premiere, The Room received a national release. By then, the movie had reached legendary status. Not because the critics were wrong, but because of how right they were. The cringeworthy dialogue and nonsensical subplots fascinated fans and captured a cult following that grew every year. In 2013, it spawned a popular nonfiction book titled The Disaster Artist, chronicling one of the lead actor's experience on the set. Then, in 2017, the book became a blockbuster movie, starring James Franco as Tommy Wiseau and receiving critical acclaim. The Room—dubbed one of the worst movies of all time—achieved a legacy that most directors could only dream of.

This perverse trajectory highlights the strange fate of movies so bad they become successful. Of course, the path is not guaranteed: Oblivion is a far more likely destination for a terrible movie. But the possibility is always there.

This slideshow runs through a selection of movies currently deemed the worst of all time by Rotten Tomatoes, the popular film review aggregation website. Every movie listed here has a 0 percent score, meaning that not a single critic has given it a positive review. In the case of one of them, this is a truly remarkable feat, as more than 100 critics reviewed it.

If you didn't have the opportunity to see these turkeys at the cinema, who knows—maybe a cult re-release isn't far away.

01-Staying-Alive-Paramount-Pictures
"Staying Alive" (1983). John Travolta and Cynthia Rhodes star in an overblown sequel to "Saturday Night Fever." A dance film written by Sylvester Stallone, directed by Sylvester Stallone, produced by Sylvester Stallone...and that is all you need to know. Number of reviews: 24. Paramount Pictures