Your Family Photos From Disney Could Appear in the Smithsonian, Museum Says

The Smithsonian National Museum of American History recently announced on its website that it wants Disney-goers to submit their family photos, which "might appear in the museum."

According to the museum's website, the call for submissions is part of a "future project" related to the Disney parks. Submissions, the museum said, will contribute to "ongoing research on how visitors use, experience, and enjoy the Disney parks."

"We want to see photographs that show Disney parks as you experienced them: posing with characters, kids worn out and sleeping, families, couples, individuals, people of all abilities, ethnicities, ages, on rides, eating together, looking at maps—everyday stuff!" the museum exclaimed.

"We love candid and posed [photos], even fingers on the lens are A-OK. We can crop photos for composition, so don't hold back on blurry or double-exposed photos," the museum added.

Photo examples included on the museum's website show children eating Mickey Mouse-shaped ice cream, babies sleeping in strollers and families smiling on rollercoasters.

The Smithsonian has also asked that park-lovers submit stories to go along with their photos, stories that answer questions such as: "When was the visit, and with whom? What feelings did it evoke for you?"

It's no secret that people love Disney. In 2019, Walt Disney World's Magic Kingdom was the most visited theme park in the world with nearly 21,000,000 visitors, according to Statista.

The second most popular theme park that year, with more than 18,000,000 visitors, was Disneyland Anaheim. And in third place was Tokyo Disneyland, which saw more than 17,000,000 guests.

Of course, the parks saw a significant decrease in visitors in 2020 as a result of the pandemic. Still, Magic Kingdom retained its top position with nearly 7,000,000 guests, said Statista.

Speaking to Vox, Margaret King, the director of the Center for Cultural Studies and Analysis, said that American theme parks are so beloved because they are "a museum of us, of America."

"It's a distillation of the qualities we most value and like about ourselves," she continued.

Vox went on to say that the Disney parks, specifically, "reflect the small-town ideals, the innocence, the inventiveness, the strong work ethic, and other characteristics that are part of Americans' self-image."

A spokesperson for the museum told Newsweek that the Disney parks project is a "short-term research project."

Those who choose to submit photos should bear in mind that their photos and/or stories might not be selected for the project.

"We won't be able to use all the images we receive, as we have limited space. Privacy and permissions rules will also impact which images we can use," the museum said on its website.

"If you aren't the child in the photo (or their guardian), we won't be able to use photos in which a child's face is identifiable. Same for Disney cast members," the museum continued.

Submissions are due by February 14, 2022.

Disney World
The Smithsonian National Museum of American History recently announced on its website that it wants Disney-goers to submit their family photos, which “might appear in the museum.” Above, singer Ariana Grande poses with Mickey Mouse at Disney's Magic Kingdom. Handout / Handout/Getty