Carrie Fisher Had Cocaine, Heroin, Ecstasy in System Prior to Death

Carrie Fisher's full autopsy was released on Monday, and it showed that the actress had cocaine, heroin and ecstasy in her system after suffering a massive heart attack December 23, days before her death.

Fisher died on December 27 due to complications related to "sleep apnea and other undetermined factors," according to a report released Friday by the Los Angeles County Coroner's Office. The findings were the result of a body examination performed on Fisher three days after her death, one that also found signs of "multiple drug intake."

Despite the multiple illicit substances found in Fisher's system, the coroner's office stopped short of linking them to her death. “Based on the available toxicological information, we cannot establish the significance of the multiple substances that were detected in Ms. Fisher’s blood and tissue, with regard to the cause of death," the Monday report read.

Related: Carrie Fisher death: What is sleep apnea?

Following last week's release of the results of the body examination, Fisher's daughter, Billie Lourd, released a statement to People. "My mom battled drug addiction and mental illness her entire life," she wrote. "She ultimately died of it. She was purposefully open in all of her work about the social stigmas surrounding these diseases."

At the joint funeral for Fisher and her mother, Debbie Reynolds, who died a day after her daughter, Fisher's ashes were stored in an urn that looked like a giant Prozac pill, which had been one of her favorite possessions. The cover of Fisher's 2008 book, Wishful Drinking, featured spilled pills and a martini glass. The actress also often spoke candidly about her struggles with drugs and mental health.

"She talked about the shame that torments people and their families confronted by these diseases," Lourde continued in her statement. "I know my Mom, she'd want her death to encourage people to be open about their struggles. Seek help, fight for government funding for mental health programs."

“I would tell you, from my perspective, that there’s certainly no news that Carrie did drugs,” her brother Todd Fisher said on Friday, continuing to say that he was "not shocked" that her health had been affected by drugs.

The coroner's office also detailed that “the exposure to cocaine took place sometime approximately in the last 72 hours of the sample that was obtained" and that the exposure to MDMA (also referred to as ecstasy) was "remote." Though they were present in her system, it could not be determined whether Fisher took MDMA or heroin.

“Ms. Fisher suffered what appeared to be a cardiac arrest on the airplane accompanied by vomiting and with a history of sleep apnea," the report states. "Based on the available toxicological information, we cannot establish the significance of the multiple substances that were detected in Ms. Fisher’s blood and tissue, with regard to the cause of death."

Join the Discussion