Most Americans Think Snowden Did the Right Thing, Poll Says

Newsmaker Snowden
The survey found that 55 percent of respondents think Snowden did the right thing in exposing PRISM, the mass data mining program The Guardian/Getty

Nearly a year after Edward Snowden first leaked classified documents revealing the extent of National Security Agency surveillance programs, more than half of employed Americans believe he was in the right, according to a survey commissioned by cloud storage service Tresorit.

The survey found that 55 percent of respondents think Snowden did the right thing in exposing PRISM, the mass data-mining program, while another 29 percent believe he was in the wrong, and 16 percent endorse neither statement. Of Snowden’s supporters, 80 percent said he exposed constitutional violations.

Eighty-two percent of respondents said they still believe corporate information is being monitored by the U.S. government, and 51 percent said their employer has taken steps to make sure corporate files are secure.

Research firm YouGov carried out the study by surveying more than a thousand “employed American adults.”

Thursday, June 5, marks one year since the first of Snowden’s leaks were made public by the media, though national interest hasn’t waned much since then. Edward Snowden still captures national attention, as his NBC interview last week demonstrated, and his revelations have helped spearhead an entire subset of media focus on NSA spying and surveillance programs.

Snowden himself, of course, remains well outside U.S. borders, where he will remain, barring capture or some sort of a deal.

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