Baby Strollers Recalled Over Amputation Fears

A stroller company announced Thursday that it had recalled a stroller over concerns about possible finger amputations.

In a statement on its website, the company, UPPAbaby, said it had recalled all-terrain RIDGE strollers manufactured between October 2021 and August 2022 following a consumer report.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission said that the product had been recalled as of September 1, and that the stroller's rear breaks have "openings that can cause amputation or laceration if a non-occupant child's fingertip gets caught in the openings while the stroller is in use." About 14,400 units will be impacted by the recall, according to the commission.

In its statement, UPPAbaby said: "We take all product inquiries very seriously. Based on one consumer report to us, we believe the injury is likely due to consumer misuse. The RIDGE's disc brakes have openings that can cause amputation or laceration if a non-occupant child's fingertip gets caught in the openings while the stroller is in use."

Baby Strollers Recalled Over Amputation Fears
Security workers stand inside an office lobby as a woman pushes a stroller and child along a sidewalk in Manhattan, New York, on June 3, 2021. A stroller company announced Thursday that it had recalled a stroller over concerns about possible finger amputations. Ed Jones

It added that its top priority is "the safety of children."

"We conduct extensive testing to ensure UPPAbaby products meet all global industry and regulatory standards," the company wrote.

The company noted that any consumers who owned the recalled stroller will receive free replacement disk breaks.

Newsweek has reached out to UPPAbaby for additional comment.

The news about the strollers on Thursday marks the latest recall of baby products in the U.S.

Last month, the Consumer Product Safety Commission announced that other baby products, the 4moms MamaRoo Baby Swing and RockaRoo Baby Rocker, had been recalled because its straps posed a strangulation hazard.

In May, the U.S. experienced a major shortage of baby formula, in part because several brands of baby formula had been recalled over health concerns.

In February, the commission announced it was suing Leachco, a company that refused to recall some of the infant loungers it manufactures despite suffocation hazards. At the time, the commission said that two infant deaths had been reported in connection with the use of the product.

"Consumers deserve transparency about known product hazards. Consumers also deserve products that are safe," Peter Feldman, commissioner of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission said in a statement in February.

In September of last year, millions of Boppy Company loungers were recalled after eight infants reportedly died from using their loungers. Almost 3.3 million loungers were recalled from major department stores. The products were distributed in both the U.S. and Canada, and infants reportedly suffocated after being placed on the loungers.