Black Racer Snake Severely Entangled in Mesh Rescued by Florida Vets

A snake that became severely entangled in mesh netting has been rescued by Florida vets.

Vets found that the black racer snake had suffered painful injuries all over its body, after being trapped in the netting for some time.

Haillie Mesics, Marketing Director at the clinic, told Newsweek that snakes struggle to free themselves from netting such as this. "Their struggle can cause it to become more entangled resulting in internal injuries, trauma to the scales, or even fatalities," she said.

Staff at the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife treated the wounds and hope to release the snake back into the wild.

Black racer snake
A photo shows the snake completely surrounded in mesh netting. The Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife CROW)/The Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW

The snake, also known as an eastern racer or Coluber constrictor, was found at the beginning of the week in Sanibel, Florida according to a Facebook post by the clinic.

A homeowner, who had used mesh netting for landscaping and gardening purposes, rescued the serpent and brought it to the clinic for treatment.

Pictures of the black racer before treatment shows the middle of its body completely engulfed in the wired mesh.

Another picture shows veterinarians attempting to free the snake by using scissors to cut around the netting.

Black racer snake
A photo shows vets trying to release the snake by cutting around the mesh netting with scissors. The Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife CROW)/The Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW

Once hospital staff had freed the snake from the netting, veterinarians found multiple constriction injuries around five different regions of its body. There was also general swelling and deeper wounds around the middle of the body.

A picture of the snake's body after it had been freed shows where the mesh netting had dug into its skin, leaving painful marks.

Black racer snake
A photo shows several deep, painful wounds on the snakes skin. The Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife CROW)/The Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW

The snake was then given pain medications and placed under supportive care in the hospital's rehabilitative temperature-controlled reptile room.

In the Facebook post, the clinic said that people who use mesh netting in and around their home should check it daily, to see if any creatures have become trapped.

Veterinarians plan to do regular check ups on the snake to evaluate the wounds and consider it for release.

There are 44 species of snakes in Florida, found in coastal mangroves, freshwater wetlands, dry uplands and residential areas. Black racer snakes are non-venomous and tend to be harmless to humans as long as they are left alone. They are common in the state and can often be found in suburban homes. They usually measure between 20 and 60 inches in length.

The Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife accepts all native wildlife patients including snakes, migratory birds and aquatic creatures, such as sea turtles.

Other patients received at the clinic recently have included two pelicans with red tide poisoning. In a Facebook post, the clinic said the pelicans were found by a boat captain and a group of kayakers. They will continue to recover at the clinic under close monitoring.

In another Facebook post, the clinic said it had released a female bald eagle, that was admitted in December after being found unable to fly. Vets put this down to facial abrasions, pain in the shoulder, bruising in its muscles, and a fish bone in its toe.

This article has been updated to include quotes from Haillie Mesics.