Chinese State Media Compares Pro-Trump Rioters to Hong Kong: 'Learning from You Guys'

Chinese state-run media has compared the supporters of President Donald Trump who stormed the U.S. Capitol building on Wednesday to pro-Democracy protesters in Hong Kong.

Chen Weihua, EU Bureau Chief for China's state-run China Daily newspaper, compared the two groups after violence erupted at the Capitol was Congress was meeting to officially certify President-elect Joe Biden's victory over Trump.

"Good comparison: Here are Pro-Trump rioters," Chen tweeted. "But when HK mobs stormed legislative building, vandalized everything and threw petrol bombs and destroyed subway stations and paralyzed airport terminals in later riots, you guys praised them as 'pro-democracy protesters'. No logic."

Good comparison: Here are Pro-Trump rioters. But when HK mobs stormed legislative building, vandalized everything and threw petrol bombs and destroyed subway stations and paralyzed airport terminals in later riots, you guys praised them as “pro-democracy protesters”. No logic.

— Chen Weihua (陈卫华) (@chenweihua) January 6, 2021

When New York Times Columnist Nicholas Kristof shared Chen's tweet while remarking that "China is chortling at the violence Trump has unleashed," Chen responded by adding "just learning from you guys."

Just learning from you guys

— Chen Weihua (陈卫华) (@chenweihua) January 6, 2021

The Chinese government has been increasingly cracking down on protesters in Hong Kong following the passage of a controversial national security law last summer. Protests have increased in recent years as the country seeks to assert authority over the special administrative region.

Before Trump supporters stormed the Capitol on Wednesday, Hong Kong officials announced that at least 53 individuals had been arrested in the latest crackdown, including American lawyer John Clancey.

Antony Blinken, Biden's choice for Secretary of State, tweeted that the "sweeping arrests of pro-democracy demonstrators are an assault on those bravely advocating for universal rights," while promising "the Biden-Harris administration will stand with the people of Hong Kong and against Beijing's crackdown on democracy."

Although Chen compared chaos in Washington, D.C. to protests in Hong Kong, there are some key differences between the two situations. Hong Protesters have largely been demonstrating in favor of democracy in the region, while the actions of those who stormed the Capitol were more likely an attempt to subvert democracy because Trump lost a democratic election.

Congress was meeting to officially certify Biden's win when the violent scene unfolded. Trump tweeted out criticism of Vice President Mike Pence when it became clear that he would not overturn the election result, something he has no Constitutional ability to do, when lawmakers were evacuated as the rioters breached the building.

Trump asked the rioters to "go home" while praising them as "very special people" and falsely claiming that the election was "stolen" in a video posted to Twitter. He later tweeted that "these are the things and events that happen when a sacred landslide election victory is so unceremoniously & viciously stripped away from great patriots who have been badly & unfairly treated for so long." Twitter later deleted both the video and the tweet.

Biden won the election by 306 to 232 votes in the Electoral College, the same margin that Trump had over former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in 2016. The president-elect also beat Trump by more than 7 million votes nationally with over 81.2 million votes, the most ever won by a presidential candidate in U.S. history.

Newsweek reached out to the White House for comment.

U.S. Capitol China Hong Kong Riots
Flags of the United States and China are pictured flying next to each other against a blue sky background. Oleksii Liskonih/Getty