Donald Trump Suggests He Might Be Reinstated Due to 'Tremendous' Voter Fraud

Donald Trump Voter Fraud Reinstatement 2020 Election
Former President Donald Trump said "we'll see what happens" when asked when the country would "get President Trump back" on Saturday. Trump is pictured during his "Save America" rally in Perry, Georgia on September 25, 2021. Sean Rayford/Getty

Former President Donald Trump has suggested he could be inexplicably reinstated as president due to "tremendous voter fraud."

In remarks to conservative media network Real America's Voice, Trump seemingly indicated that baseless conspiracy theories that claim he will quickly regain the presidency if it were a possibility. Host Gina Loudon, who has also served as co-chair of the group Women for Trump, asked the former president when the country would "get President Trump back" at his rally in Perry, Georgia on Saturday.

"Well we're going to see," Trump replied. "There's been tremendous voter fraud. And it's being revealed on a daily basis and we'll see what happens."

Newsweek reached out to the office of Trump for comment.

No credible evidence of substantial voter fraud has been uncovered in the more than 10 months since Trump lost the 2020 presidential election to President Joe Biden, while the election results have long since been certified and finalized. Trump has continued to fight the outcome despite there being no legal pathway for him to be declared the winner or return to office without winning another election.

Trump said he was "looking back" to "find out what happened" during his Saturday interview, while also stressing that some states were "making their rules and regulations" for upcoming elections. The former president said that Republican-backed efforts to change voting laws on issues like ballot signature verification and voter identification would have an impact on future elections.

"I think you're going to be incredibly impressed by what's happening and I think maybe by the next election," said Trump, who has repeatedly hinted that he will be a 2024 candidate without making a firm commitment to run.

Despite Trump's claims that he "won" in 2020, his lawyers failed to convince multiple judges he appointed amid dozens of failed legal challenges in the aftermath of the election. The ex-president has continued to claim that evidence shows massive fraud was a factor in his loss, although no such evidence has been presented and further investigation have only confirmed Biden's victory.

The results of a controversial audit in Arizona's Maricopa County, conducted at the behest of the Republican-controlled state Senate, on Friday found that Trump lost the county to Biden by a slightly larger margin than in the official results. Regardless, fact-free assertions that the exercise provided evidence of fraud and calls for the election to be "decertified" persisted. Trump himself presented a wildly inaccurate summary of the results during his Georgia rally.

"We won at the Arizona forensic audit yesterday at a level that you wouldn't believe," Trump told the crowd on Saturday. "They had headlines that Biden wins in Arizona, when they know it's not true. He didn't win in Arizona. He lost in Arizona based on the forensic audit."