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Doomsday Postponed for Third Time: Will the World Ever End?

1024px-NASA-Apollo8-Dec24-Earthrise
The Earth as seen from the moon. NASA/Bill Anders

The end of the world has been rescheduled—again.

Now, conspiracy theorists say we have another month to go before an apocalypse, brought on by the appearance of a mystery 10th planet called Nibiru, threatens to wipe out the earth.

In September, conspiracy theorist David Meade’s doomsday prediction made global headlines. But when the world was still intact after the supposed event on September 23, he rescheduled the impending apocalypse to October 15. That date, too, has come and gone with no sign of Nibiru or the prophesied rapture.

Now, a conspiracy website called Planet X News, for which Meade is an occasional contributor, is predicting a series of cataclysmic earthquakes beginning November 19.

Meade previously said that October 15 would mark seven years of tribulation, as foretold in the biblical Book of Revelation. He said that an asteroid named Wormwood would hit Earth and the mysterious Planet X, or Nibiru, would either cross or collide with our planet.

“That’s when the action starts. Hold on and watch—wait until the middle of October and I don’t believe you’ll be disappointed,” he wrote in September.

The new earthquake-driven apocalypse is expected to include “one or more 7-magnitude earthquake events,” according to Planet X News.

So, what will happen when the rapture finally hits? Meade has said a loss of electrical power across the world would lead to famine, nuclear war and other catastrophic events.

He believes the seven-year period of tribulation will be followed by a millennium of peace. But before then, one billion people will die.

NASA has continuously denied the existence of Nibiru.

“Various people are ‘predicting’ that world will end Sept. 23 when another planet collides with Earth. The planet in question, Nibiru, doesn't exist, so there will be no collision,” the official NASA website said in September.

The world will obviously end one day—but probably not for several billion years when the sun expands.

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