Joe Biden, Who Touted Unity, Says He Doesn't Know If Republican Party Will Exist in 2024

President Joe Biden asserted on Thursday that he plans to run for reelection in 2024, while also questioning whether the Republican Party will still exist at that time.

"Yes, my plan is to run for reelection. That's my expectation," Biden said during a press conference, the first the president has held since he took office. He was responding to a reporter's question about why he had not yet set up a reelection campaign, as former President Donald Trump had already done by this point in his presidency.

Later, Biden was asked if he expected to be running against Trump in the next election.

"Oh, come on. I don't even think about—I have no idea. I have no idea if there will be a Republican Party. Do you?" Biden asked in response. The president also said that he would "fully expect" Vice President Kamala Harris to be his running mate in 2024.

"She's doing a great job. She's a great partner," Biden said.

President Joe Biden
President Joe Biden answers a question during his first press briefing in the East Room of the White House in Washington, D.C. on March 25 JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

Trump has repeatedly teased a 2024 run for president and polls of GOP voters suggest that he would be a clear frontrunner for the Republican Party's nomination. At the same time, there is a significant minority of Republicans in Congress and among GOP voters who remain staunchly opposed to the former president—particularly in the wake of the violent January 6 insurrection against the U.S. Capitol. Republican critics of Trump take issue with his divisive rhetoric and contentious style of politics.

During his presidential campaign, Biden repeatedly criticized Trump for dividing America and positioned himself as a unifier. Following his election, and in his inaugural speech, the president emphasized his desire to govern in a bipartisan manner to bring the country together. But Biden has struggled thus far to garner Republican support in Congress for his policy agenda.

Not a single Republican in the House or Senate voted in support of the president's $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan—which provided $1,400 stimulus checks to Americans, shored up federal unemployment and significantly expanded child tax credits, among other sorts of key funding for working Americans. The White House pushed back against GOP criticism of the Democratic legislation, pointing out that polls showed significant bipartisan support among voters.

Biden reiterated his efforts to "unite the country" during his Thursday press conference as well.

"Generically speaking, all of you said, 'No, you can't do that,'" Biden told the room of reporters. "Well, I've not been able to unite the Congress, but I've been uniting the country, based on the polling data. We have to come together," he said.

Updated 3/25/2021, 3:24 p.m. ET: This article has been updated with additional context and information.