NASA Perseverance Rover Records First-Ever Sound of Wind on Mars

NASA's Perseverance rover, which successfully landed on Mars on February 18, has obtained the first ever audio recording of wind on the red planet.

In a video shared by CBS news on Friday, NASA engineer Elizabeth Duffy describes the recording as "awesome," and said the new audio will allow scientists to discover a "whole complete story of Mars."

"Hearing the wind is just so awesome. When you think about it, we are hearing something that is so far away on another planet, and now we know what that wind actually sounds like," Duffy told CBS News.

"It's going to be able to tell us a whole complete story of Mars, which is what we're after."

NASA engineer Elizabeth Duffy says hearing the wind on Mars is "awesome": "When you think about it, we're hearing something that is so far away on another planet and now we know what that wind gust actually sounds like. It's going to tell us a whole complete story of Mars" pic.twitter.com/4v42h9NMdE

— CBS News (@CBSNews) March 5, 2021

Along with 25 onboard cameras, the rover also carries two microphones. Though one failed to work during the rover's descent, the other captured the sounds of wind blowing past, as well as the noise of the spacecraft itself, CBS reported.

The audio tape was first released on February 22, and marks the first time noise has ever been recorded on another planet. NASA released two separate clips of the same recording, one that filters out the noise of Perseverance and one that includes it.

"I think of the microphones on the rover as adding another sense for us," Duffy told CBS. "It just is going to give us this whole picture of what it's like to be on Mars."

Mission team members have said that they hope to hear many more sounds from Mars, including storms, falling rocks and the sound of the rover's wheels as it moves across the planet's surface.

"Imagine yourself sitting on the surface of Mars and listening to the surroundings," Dave Gruel, lead engineer for the rover's camera and microphone subsystem, said during a February 22 news briefing. "It's cool. Really neat. Overwhelming, if you will."

NASA rover
NASA's Perseverance rover has captured the first ever audio recording of wind on Mars. In this concept illustration provided by NASA, NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter stands on the Red Planet's surface as NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance rover (partially visible on the left) rolls away. NASA via Getty Images/Getty Images

In addition to audio, the rover has captured some of the most stunning images of the planet to date.

Color photos have been captured using the rover's Mastcam-Z camera system, which can zero in on the planet with extraordinary detail.

Images so far have shown the arid landscape of the rover's landing site—the 28-mile-wide Jezero Crater. Researchers believe this area was once home to a river delta billions of years ago, making it a promising spot to search for signs of ancient microbial life.

The agency says the rover's cameras can zoom in, focus, and take 3D pictures and video at high speed, enabling the detailed examination of distant objects.

Its main function will be to take photos of the Martian surface and features in the red planet's thin atmosphere, and allow scientists to examine them with a new sense of detail.

"Perseverance is just getting started, and already has provided some of the most iconic visuals in space exploration history," Steve Jurczyk, acting NASA administrator, said in a statement last month.

Thousands of images plus video and the audio recordings from the rover are now publicly available on the agency's website.