Russian Power Plant Attacks Pushing West to Send Better Weapons: Ukraine

Mykhailo Podolyak, an adviser to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, recently said that Russian attacks on power plants will only push the West to send better weapons to Ukraine.

"…What our partners can help us with right now is air defense and missile defense systems. In any modification. Nasams [National Advanced Surface-to-Air Missile Systems] and Iris [advanced air defense systems] have already been agreed," Podolyak told Ukrainian news agency Interfax on Friday.

"But we need more, faster and already yesterday. I believe that Russia's demonstrative strikes on thermal power plants and hydrotechnical facilities will speed up the process of transferring these systems to us," he added, according to a translation.

Recently, Russia has been targeting Ukrainian dams and power plants, with the latest attack involving eight of its rockets hitting water systems in Kryvyi Rih on Wednesday, according to Anton Gerashchenko, an adviser to the Ukrainian minister of internal affairs.

Russian Power Plant Attacks Pushing West to-provide-weapons
Pictured above, Ukrainian soldiers sit on infantry fighting vehicles as they drive near Izium in eastern Ukraine on September 16. Mykhailo Podolyak, an adviser to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, recently said that Russian attacks on power plants will only push the West to send better weapons to Ukraine. Photo by JUAN BARRETO/AFP via Getty Images

Kyrylo Tymoshenko, the deputy head of Zelensky's office, said Russia "obviously wants to cause a crisis situation," according to Gerashchenko.

Additionally, a video broadcast on Russian state TV network RT showed a Russian attack in which a helicopter fired a missile near the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant, destroying some type of large structure at sea.

"Target above water acquired," the pilot in the video says before a rocket is fired, later adding, "Target destroyed."

However, Podolyak noted that Ukrainian forces are still able to take down Russian missiles in the country's fight against President Vladimir Putin's invasion, which has been ongoing for over six months.

"Despite the 'bender' fantasies of the Russian Ministry of Defense, our air defense system effectively shoots down Russian missiles. This is the key," Podolyak told Interfax.

"We are getting equipment, capabilities, intelligence, all the tools for the effective destruction of the occupying army. Slower than we would like, but still," he added.

He continued by saying that Ukraine is not asking for anyone to fight for the Eastern European country's freedom, but pressed that all the country needs "today is the right amount of specific weapons and ammunition in the most timely deliveries."

Meanwhile, the U.S. is expected to send another $600 million worth of military aid to Ukraine to help forces continue their counteroffensive efforts. The aid package includes additional arms, munitions and equipment from Defense Department inventories. An overall $15.8 billion worth of military aid has been provided by the U.S. since the war began in February.

Newsweek reached out to the Russian foreign affairs ministry for comment.