Tucker Carlson, 'Have You Been Vaccinated?' Dr. Reiner Blasts 'Saboteur' Fox News Host

Dr. Jonathan Reiner challenged Tucker Carlson to tell his viewers whether he has been vaccinated after the Fox News host claimed thousands had died after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine.

The doctor's comments came after Carlson suggested last week that a higher-than-normal number of Americans had died after receiving the vaccine since last year.

During the Wednesday night episode of the Tucker Carlson Tonight show, the host said: "Between late December of 2020 and last month, a total of 3,362 people apparently died after getting the COVID vaccine in the United States.

"That's an average of roughly 30 people every day."

He continued: "It's clear that what is happening now, for whatever reason, is not even close to normal. It is not even close to what we see in previous years with previous vaccines. Most vaccines are not accused of killing large numbers of people."

Appearing on a segment with CNN anchor Jim Acosta on Sunday, Reiner hit out at the Fox News host's comments about the COVID-19 vaccine.

Reiner said: "I think he's really a saboteur, that's what I think of Tucker Carlson. Every night he has a million questions about this vaccine and, somehow, magically he has no one on his show that can answer these questions.

"I'm willing to answer these questions and I have two questions for Tucker Carlson. Number 1, have you been vaccinated and number 2, why won't you tell your audience whether you've been vaccinated."

"I'm tired of his nonsense," he added.

Carlson's comments about vaccine deaths sparked a backlash and the host even drew fire from Fox News contributors, though he was not directly named.

Hours after Carlson made his comments, Fox News contributor Dr. Nicole Saphier tweeted: "It's intriguing the people who claim COVID deaths were overinflated from concomitant illness are the same people who are saying people dying after the vaccine are dying from the vaccine and not because we vaccinated the most elderly, frail, sick individuals with short life spans."

Every medication, medical treatment and vaccine pose risks, as does getting in your car every day. It is crucial there is transparency on the risks with a thoughtful discussion of risk v benefits before engaging in anything.

— Nicole Saphier, MD (@NBSaphierMD) May 6, 2021

She added: "Every medication, medical treatment and vaccine pose risks, as does getting in your car every day. It is crucial there is transparency on the risks with a thoughtful discussion of risk v benefits before engaging in anything."

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said the vaccines are "safe and effective" and added each reported death is reviewed and assessed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and its own physicians.

It added: "A review of available clinical information, including death certificates, autopsy and medical records has not established a causal link to COVID-19 vaccines.

"However, recent reports indicate a plausible causal relationship between the J&J/Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine and a rare and serious adverse event—blood clots with low platelets—which has caused deaths."

The CDC has recorded that more than 245 million doses of the vaccine have been administered in the U.S. from December 14, 2020, to May 3, 2021.

Over this period there were 4,178 reported deaths (0.0017 percent) among those who had the vaccine.

It is not the first time Carlson has courted controversy, with Dr. Anthony Fauci remarking last month that the Fox News host had spread a "crazy conspiracy theory" about COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness.

He also drew fire after defending Joe Rogan after the podcast host previously suggested young people should avoid getting the COVID vaccine, a comment he would later roll back in a later edition of his podcast.

Newsweek has contacted Fox News for comment.

Tucker Carlson drew critisicm over his comments
In this photo, Fox News host Tucker Carlson discusses "Populism and the Right" during the National Review Institute's Ideas Summit at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel March 29, 2019 in Washington, DC. Carlson has drawn criticism over his comments on COVID vaccines. Chip Somodevilla / Staff/Getty