Twitch Hacked as Creator Earnings Allegedly Released Online

Twitch, the live streaming video service popular with gamers, has been hacked and streamer payout reports leaked online, a spokesperson has confirmed.

A 128GB torrent was uploaded onto message board website 4Chan late on Tuesday night and included Twitch creator payout reports dating back to 2019.

British video game news website Eurogamer added the leak also included information about Twitch clients, every property Twitch owns and an unreleased competitor for video game distribution service Steam

According to the anonymous poster on 4Chan, the reason behind the leak was to "foster more disruption and competition in the online video streaming space."

The anonymous poster also called the Twitch community a "disgusting toxic cesspool" and that they had released the Twitch source code.

It also included the hashtag #DoBetterTwitch, which Eurogamer reported was similar to another hashtag used by marginalized streamers in order to force Twitch to improve its safety measures.

The person who shared the information on 4Chan named the post: "Twitch leaks part one."

In a statement shared in a Twitter statement on Wednesday afternoon, a Twitch spokesperson said: "We can confirm a breach has taken place.

"Our teams are working with urgency to understand the extent of this. We will update the community as soon as additional information is available. Thank you for bearing with us."

We can confirm a breach has taken place. Our teams are working with urgency to understand the extent of this. We will update the community as soon as additional information is available. Thank you for bearing with us.

— Twitch (@Twitch) October 6, 2021

Earlier this month, content creators on Twitch boycotted the streaming service following an increase in so-called "hate raids."

The virtual walkout was carried out as an attempt to raise awareness of the ongoing harassment directed towards marginalized streamers.

This includes users sharing transphobic and homophobic comments as well as racial and anti-LGBTQ+ rhetoric.

These random mobs are called "hate raids" and happen when internet trolls target and harass streamers.

Other cases involve posting abusive messages in a streamer's chat. The increase in the number of hate raids is due in part to bots sharing hundreds of generated comments.

Last month, Twitch said it was open to tackling hate raids on its platform in a series of Twitter posts.

No one should have to experience malicious and hateful attacks based on who they are or what they stand for. This is not the community we want on Twitch, and we want you to know we are working hard to make Twitch a safer place for creators. https://t.co/fDbw62e5LW

— Twitch (@Twitch) August 20, 2021

On August 20, a Twitch spokesperson said: "No one should have to experience malicious and hateful attacks based on who they are or what they stand for.

"This is not the community we want on Twitch, and we want you to know we are working hard to make Twitch a safer place for creators."

A follow-up tweet added: "Hate spam attacks are the result of highly motivated bad actors and do not have a simple fix.

"Your reports have helped us take action–we've been continually updating our sitewide banned word filters to help prevent variations on hateful slurs, and removing bots when identified."

Amazon bought Twitch for $970 million in 2014 and according to the company has 30 million unique users stream on the website daily.

According to Twitch, 41 percent of its users are aged between 16 and 24 and 32 percent fall into the 25 to 34 range.

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Twitch was reportedly hacked on Tuesday. A picture taken at the Tokyo Game Show on September 21, 2018, shows the logo of the VOD and streaming video games company Twitch. Martin Bureau/Getty Images