Five States Where Coronavirus Deaths Are Rising Fastest

Coronavirus deaths in the U.S. have surpassed 200,000, according to the latest figures from Johns Hopkins University. At least a handful of states have each seen a rise in new deaths per capita (100,000 people) in the latest two-week period.

Below are five states that have reported the largest increase in new deaths per capita over the past week, from the previous seven days, according to data compiled by The New York Times. All population data below from the U.S. Census Bureau, as of July 2019.

Missouri

Week-to-week change in new deaths per capita: 70

  • New deaths per capita in week one: 152
  • New deaths per capita in week two: 82
  • Total confirmed deaths: 1,967
  • Total population: 6,137,428

The seven-day average of daily new deaths in Missouri mostly increased from late March to around mid-May, peaking at 17 on May 12, before mostly declining through late July. The figure rose again and peaked at a higher level, reaching 19 on September 6. Average daily new deaths then dropped on a brief but sharp decline through mid-September before it peaked again at 22 on September 22, according to Worldometer.

Virginia

Week-to-week change in new deaths per capita: 68

  • New deaths per capita in week one: 221
  • New deaths per capita in week two: 153
  • Total confirmed deaths: 3,060
  • Total population: 8,535,519

The seven-day moving average of daily new deaths in Virginia mostly increased from late March to early May before decreasing through late May. The figure briefly rose on a sharp incline through late May before mostly decreasing through late June. The average count then slightly flattened out until around September 12 before rising sharply through the rest of the month, peaking at 42 on September 20, according to Worldometer.

Early voters, Fairfax, Virginia on September 2020
People waiting on line to vote early at the Fairfax Government Center on September 18 in Virginia. The state is among the top five states that have seen the largest jump in new COVID-19 deaths in recent weeks. Getty Images

North Dakota

Week-to-week change in new deaths per capita: 9

  • New deaths per capita in week one: 24
  • New deaths per capita in week two: 15
  • Total confirmed deaths: 199
  • Total population: 762,062

The seven-day moving average of daily new deaths in North Dakota remained mostly flat since late March, hovering from zero to one. It mostly increased from around September 12 and peaked at four on September 19 and 21, according to data compiled by Worldometer.

South Dakota

Week-to-week change in new deaths per capita: 7

  • New deaths per capita in week one: 18
  • New deaths per capita in week two: 11
  • Total confirmed deaths: 202
  • Total population: 884,659

The seven-day moving average of daily new fatalities in South Dakota remained mostly flat from early April through early September, hovering from zero to two. It increased on a sharper incline through the rest of September, peaking at three in late September, according to data compiled by Worldometer.

Hawaii

Week-to-week change in new deaths per capita: 8

  • New deaths per capita in week one: 20
  • New deaths per capita in week two: 12
  • Total confirmed deaths: 119
  • Total population: 1,415,872

The seven-day moving average of daily new deaths in Hawaii remained mostly flat from early April to late August, hovering from zero to two. The figure rose on a sharp incline from then, peaking at four in early September and declined through mid-September before rising sharply through late September, peaking at four again on September 18, according to Worldometer.

The wider picture

The novel coronavirus has infected over 31.6 million people across the globe since it was first reported in Wuhan, China, including nearly 6.9 million in the U.S. Over 971,700 have died following infection, while more than 21.7 million have reportedly recovered as of Wednesday, according to JHU.

The graphic below, provided by Statista, illustrates U.S. states with the most COVID-19 cases.

COVID-19 cases in U.S.
STATISTA

The below graphic, also provided by Statista, illustrates the percentage of Americans who do or don't want COVID-19 restrictions to be relaxed in the country.

Americans US COVID-19 restrictions
STATISTA

The graphics below, also provided by Statista, illustrate the spread of COVID-19 cases in counties across the globe.

1 of 2