12 U.S. States Where Coronavirus Cases Are Rising

As coronavirus lockdown measures in the U.S. are eased, several states have reported an increase in new cases over the past few weeks.

Here we look at some of the states where the total number of new cases in the last week has risen from the previous week, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

California

  • New cases from May 21-27: 15,100
  • New cases from May 14-20: 13,100
  • Total cases to date: 101,807
  • Total deaths to date: 3,919

California was under a stay-at-home order from March 19 but entered the second phase of its reopening plan on May 8.

The second phase sees the gradual reopening of businesses including within retail and manufacturing, while offices (when remote working is not possible), outdoor museums and limited personal services have also resumed operations.

On Memorial Day large crowds flocked to the state's beaches, parks and other public spaces.

Virginia

  • New cases from May 21-27: 7,314
  • New cases from May 14-20: 6,179
  • Total cases to date: 40,249
  • Total deaths to date: 1,281

Virginia's daily case count has continued on an increasing trend for most of the outbreak since the state's first cases were reported around mid-March.

A portion of Virginia entered the first phase of its reopening plan around mid-May, allowing the reopening of some venues, including retailers, which can operate at 50 percent capacity, while restaurants can host outdoor dining at 50 percent capacity. Places of worship can host indoor services at 50 percent capacity. The reopening of the Northern Virginia region has been delayed to at least May 29.

Alabama

  • New cases from May 21-27: 2,980
  • New cases from May 14-20: 2,352
  • Total cases to date: 16,032
  • Total deaths to date: 583

Alabama has seen a mostly increasing trend in new cases in recent days from around mid-May.

Alabama was under a stay-at-home order until April 30, after which some restrictions were eased under a "safer at home" order. The latest order has seen the reopening of entertainment venues, as well as some athletic facilities, child care centers and summer camps. All reopened venues are subject to social distancing and sanitation guidelines.

Restaurants and bars can open with limited table seating and with a six feet distance between them, while retailers are open at 50 percent capacity and beaches are open with no limits on gatherings. The latest "safer at home" order is in place until July 3.

Tennessee

  • New cases from May 21-27: 2,873
  • New cases from May 14-20: 2,042
  • Total cases to date: 21,285
  • Total deaths to date: 353

Tennessee's lockdown order ended on April 30 and the majority of businesses were allowed to reopen from May 1.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee noted at the time: "These businesses will open according to specific guidance that we will provide in accordance with state and national experts in both medicine and business."

Arkansas

  • New cases from May 21-27: 1,274
  • New cases from May 14-20: 767
  • Total cases to date: 6,277
  • Total deaths to date: 120

While an official statewide lockdown was never issued in Arkansas, various venues were closed from around March 19, including bars and restaurants (which were limited to take-out or delivery services).

Beauty salons and barber shops, as well as places of worship and larger venues were allowed to reopen from May 4. Restaurants were allowed to reopen from April 29, while restrictions on gyms and other indoor recreational facilities were also lifted from April 30.

South Carolina

  • New cases from May 21-27: 1,448
  • New cases from May 14-20: 1,145
  • Total cases to date: 10,623
  • Total deaths to date: 466

A stay-at-home order was issued in South Carolina in early April. The order was lifted from around May 4, which saw the reopening of state beaches, state parks, restaurants and hotels, with guidelines and restrictions in place.

Several attractions, including zoos, museums, aquariums, water parks and amusement park rides, among others, were reopened from May 22, just before the Memorial Day weekend.

Florida

  • New cases reported May 21-27: 5,519
  • New cases reported May 14-20: 5,069
  • Total cases to date: 52,634
  • Total deaths to date: 2,319

Florida began a partial reopening on May 4, with state parks allowing access to trails, some day use areas as well as some beach access with limited facilities. The reopened state parks have restrictrions, the governor's office notes.

Oklahoma

  • New cases reported May 21-27: 697
  • New cases reported May 14-20: 674
  • Total cases to date: 6,229
  • Total deaths to date: 322

Oklahoma issued a "safer at home" order, announced on March 24, for adults over the age of 65 and vulnerable individuals with serious underlying medical conditions. Gatherings were limited to no more than 10 people, while visits to nursing homes were banned. Restaurants were limited to take-out and delivery services, while bars, gyms, salons, massage parlors and movie theaters were closed.

The state began reopening some of its businesses from April 24. It entered the second phase of its reopening plan on May 15. The second phase saw the reopening of dining, entertainment, and sporting venues and gyms as well as places of worship, while bars remain closed. The state is scheduled to enter phase three of its reopening on June 1.

Louisiana

  • New cases reported May 21-27: 3,193
  • New cases reported May 14-20: 2,654
  • Total cases to date: 38,497
  • Total deaths to date: 2,723

Louisiana was under a stay-at-home order until May 14, after which it entered the first phase of its reopening plan. The first stage has seen the reopening of some businesses with restrictions in place. The reopened facilities include non-essential retail shops, shopping malls, restaurants, bars, casinos, gyms and places of worship, among other venues.

North Carolina

  • New cases reported May 21-27: 4,656
  • New cases reported May 14-20: 3,887
  • Total cases to date: 38,497
  • Total deaths to date: 2,723

North Carolina is currently in the second phase of its reopening, which allows the reopening of more businesses, including retail shops, restaurants, barbers and personal care services at 50 percent capacity.

Clearwater Beach, Florida, May 2020
People visit Clearwater Beach in Florida after some beaches in the state were reopened at 7am on May 4, 2020. Getty Images

Maine

  • New cases reported May 21-27: 318
  • New cases reported May 14-20: 304
  • Total cases to date: 2,137
  • Total deaths to date: 79

Maine is under a "stay safer at home" order, which requires people to stay at home other than for permitted activities such as grocery shopping or exercising.

"However, it [the order] now also allows Maine people to visit businesses or participate in activities deemed safe to open under Stage 1 of the reopening plan," according to a statement from the office of Maine Gov. Janet Mills. The order is in effect until May 31.

West Virginia

  • New cases reported May 21-27: 332
  • New cases reported May 14-20: 169
  • Total cases to date: 1,899
  • Total deaths to date: 74

West Virginia was under a stay-at-home order from March 24. From May 4, the lockdown order was replaced with a "safer at home" order.

It "still strongly encourages all West Virginians to stay at home when not performing essential tasks, but no longer mandates them to stay at home. You should still stay home if you have any symptoms or have come in contact with someone who has the virus," West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice said in a statement.

The latest order saw the reopening of some businesses with restrictions, including outdoor dining services at restaurants, barber shops, hair salons and churches, among other venues.

The novel coronavirus, which was first reported in Wuhan, China, has infected more than 5.7 million people, including over 1.6 million in the U.S. More than 356,100 have died, including over 100,000 in the U.S. Over 2.3 million globally have reportedly recovered from infection, as of Thursday, according to the latest figures from Johns Hopkins University.

Data on COVID-19 cases is from Johns Hopkins University unless otherwise stated.

The graphics below, provided by Statista, illustrate the spread of COVID-19 in the U.S. and the worst-affected countries.

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