When are the Georgia Runoffs? These Two Senate Seats Still Undecided

Runoff votes for Georgia's two Senate seats have been thrown into national focus due to their potential impact over which party will control the upper chamber of Congress.

The two seats are held by Republicans: Sen. Kelly Loeffler and Sen. David Perdue.

Though recent polling has shown both incumbents being run close by their Democrat rivals Raphael Warnock, taking on Loeffler, and Jon Ossoff, challenging Perdue.

When are the Runoffs?

November 18, is the first day for a registrar to post out mail-in ballots for those voting by that method. The last date for those in the state to register to vote in the run off is December 7, according to details from the Georgia Secretary of State. Advanced in person voting for the runoff will begin on December 14. Voting day for the runoff elections is January 5, 2021.

State of the Races

The latest poll of the races shows the Republican incumbents narrowly leading their Democratic challengers.

In polling conducted by Remington Research Group and reported by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Perdue leads Ossoff by 4 points with 50 percent to 46 percent. In the race between Loeffler and Warnock, the Republican was backed by 49 percent of those asked compared to 48 percent. The polling has a margin of error of plus or minus 2.6 percent and was conducted on November 8 and 9 among 1,450 likely runoff voters in the state.

ossoff warnock
Democratic U.S. Senate candidates Jon Ossoff and Rev. Raphael Warnock hand out lawn signs at a campaign event on October 3, in Lithonia, Georgia. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

How Will Results Impact the Senate?

Republicans are set to control at least 50 seats in the next Senate, based on results, and Democrats will have 46 seats.

There are also two independents who caucus with the Democrats, taking the party up to 48 seats.

Therefore, should Democrats manage to win both Senate races they will split the Senate 50/50. Vice President-elect Kamala Harris would then have the final decision on evenly divided votes.

"If the Democrats can win both of these seats back, then they will be in control of the Senate and the president will have an agenda that won't be able to be challenged," pollster Frank Luntz recently told Squawk Box.

"If the Republicans win even one of these seats, then they [retain] control the majority and they will determine exactly what of the president's agenda will go forward."

Democrats have used this importance of the race to boost fundraising appeals for their candidates.

Ossoff, in a recent campaign email sent through the Democrats, said: "I urgently need your help. Right now, Democratic control of the Senate hinges on what happens in Georgia."

Warnock, in a separate Democrat campaign email, said: "This is our last shot at flipping the Senate, and with so much at stake, we have to give this our all."

Loeffler made a similar call for people to help her and Perdue "save the majority."

Newsweek has contacted each of the candidates for comment on the state of their races and the importance of the outcome.