When Are the Winter Olympics and How to Watch?

The 2022 Winter Olympics will be running throughout most of February, with 109 medals being awarded for the games.

This year's sporting event is being held in Beijing, China, which officially makes it the first city to host both the Winter and Summer iterations of the Olympics. There are 15 disciplines in total featured in the 2022 roster, including luge, ice hockey, ski jumping and the bobsleigh race.

With that being said, it is a jam-packed schedule and even the most dedicated viewers will struggle to keep up with everything (especially when you account for the 13-hour difference between China Standard Time and ET).

To help make sure that you don't miss anything important, Newsweek has broken down when the 2022 Winter Olympics start, and how to keep up with all the coverage.

When Are the 2022 Winter Olympics?

The Beijing Winter Olympics technically start on Friday, February 4, with the opening ceremony event at 7 a.m. ET (although live coverage is expected to start a little earlier at 6:30 a.m. ET).

However, there are actually a couple of preliminary games leading up to this. For instance, there are a pair of curling events taking place on February 2 and February 3, as well as some luge competitions around the same time.

As such, it would probably be more accurate to say that the Beijing Winter Olympics actually starts this Wednesday at 6:30 a.m. ET, when the Men's Singles Luge Training Group A Run begins.

After the opening ceremony, there will be multiple games hosted every single day, until the closing ceremony at 7 a.m. ET on Sunday, February 20.

If you want a breakdown of the full schedule, you can head over to the official Winter Olympics website, where you can filter out the events that aren't of interest to you.

How To Watch the 2022 Winter Olympics

The Olympics have various partners in different countries. These networks have the permission to live broadcast all of the events, air recaps and highlight reels, while also securing exclusive interviews with the participating athletes.

There's a full list of these broadcasting partners on the Olympics website, so you can see who has the exclusive rights for each country.

For North America, the network that has all of the Winter Olympics 2022 coverage is NBC. The Comcast subsidiary will be livestreaming the entire sporting event on its Peacock platform (including the opening and closing ceremonies) and will also be airing primetime reporting on its various TV channels.

In addition to this, Peacock viewers will also be able to access full replays of any games they happened to miss (which will be helpful considering the time difference), highlight clips and daily studio programming.

The following exclusive content will be hosted on Peacock as well.

ShowDescriptionTime
The Olympics ShowA live studio show with highlights, interviews and preview coverage8 a.m. to 10 a.m. ET
Olympic IceIn depth figure skating coverage10 a.m. to 11 a.m. ET
Winter GoldA comprehensive look at the best performances of the day11 a.m. to 12 p.m. ET
Top HighlightsMore highlights from throughout the day8 p.m. to 8 a.m. ET

For those who are unfamiliar with Peacock, it has three separate membership tiers (those being "Free", "Premium" and "Premium Plus").

When it comes to the Winter Olympics, you will need to be a Premium customer to watch all of the network's coverage. However, free members can still watch the news, recaps, and highlights.

If you want full access, a Peacock Premium membership costs a monthly fee of $4.99, or $49.99 a year. You can sign up here.

Of course, you can also tune into the traditional television channels — such as NBC, CNBC and the USA Network — for primetime coverage of the games and medal ceremonies. This will start at 8 p.m. ET on all days except Sunday, when it will start at 7 p.m.

Streaming will also be available via NBCOlympics.com and the NBC Sports app, so you have multiple choices.

Caitlin Patterson Training for 2022 Winter Olympics
Image shows skier Caitlin Patterson (of Team USA) training ahead of the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympic Games. Clive Rose/Getty Images