Worker Says Boss Got $87K Raise While Refusing $1 Bump for Staff

A university worker said he was stunned to discover that his boss received an $87,000 raise, while his department had been denied a $1 per hour raise for five years.

As inflation soars, the majority of American workers say their wages are not keeping up with prices. Consumer prices surged 9.1 percent over the year ending in June, according to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, marking the largest increase in 40 years.

Meanwhile, two-thirds of employees responding to a CNBC Momentive Workforce Survey in May said that inflation had outpaced any salary gains they made over the past 12 months. The squeeze is felt most among middle-income workers, the survey found, with people earning between $50,000 and $150,000 more likely to report a disparity between wage growth and inflation than high-income and low-income workers.

On Reddit's "Antiwork" forum, where frustrated employees turn to vent about low wages and wrongful employer practices, a university police officer has claimed that his boss got an $87,000 raise—while he and his coworkers had received no raise in years.

Police Officers
A university police officer said they were stunned to discover their boss received an $87,000 raise, while their department has been denied a $1 per hour raise for five years. His post sparked a wave of anger online, as readers recounted similar experiences with their own employers. CHANDAN KHANNA / Contributor/AFP

"I'm really f**king annoyed that my boss got an $87,000 raise and we're still fighting for a $1/hour raise after 5 years," claimed the employee, posting anonymously as u/Bluewhale001. His post has received 10,000 votes on Reddit.

"My other bosses, with only 1 position of separation between us, got $30,000 raises," he continued. "I just really wanted to vent about this. I'm having to consider working a [second] job at a local factory because of this f**king place."

The worker explained that as state employees at a public university, their salaries were publicly available. He had only been with the school for a year, but he alleged most of the 15 members of his department had gone five years without even the $1 per hour raise.

His post sparked a wave of anger online, as readers recounted similar experiences with their own employers.

"Sounds familiar," said one comment. "I work for the local technical college. We got a 2% raise (we were told an additional 2% in early 2023 as well), but the president of the college got said raise as well as a $40,000 'retention bonus' for making it [through] the year."

Another added, "I got told if I work really hard I can get more hours and responsibilities, but not [an] hourly rate increase."

"If you work really hard your boss will get another raise next year," suggested a sarcastic comment with 8,000 votes.

Newsweek reached out to u/Bluewhale001 for comment.