Gorilla Glue 'Very Sorry' to Hear About Woman Who Put Adhesive in Her Hair

Gorilla Glue said it is "very sorry" to hear about a Louisiana woman who sought medical treatment after using the company's spray adhesive on her hair.

Tessica Brown went viral earlier this month after she posted a video on TikTok explaining that her hair had been stuck in place for a month since she substituted her usual got2b Glued spray with Gorilla Glue spray adhesive after running out.

"Bad idea. My hair, it don't move. You hear what I'm telling you? It don't move," she said in the video originally posted to TikTok, where has since attracted almost four million likes.

"I've washed my hair 15 times and it don't move," she added.

In another video, she is seen slathering on shampoo and showing how it had failed to penetrate through her rigid hair.

On Saturday, Brown posted a series of images of herself checking into St. Bernard Parish Hospital in Chalmette, Louisiana on Instagram.

"This is really about to be a long process," she later captioned a photo of some acetone and sterile water.

It's not clear if Brown had managed to remove the industrial-strength glue from her hair, but she thanked people for their messages of support.

On Monday, Gorilla Glue issued a statement on Twitter saying it was glad Brown had sought medical treatment.

We are very sorry to hear about the unfortunate incident that Miss Brown experienced using our Spray Adhesive on her hair. We are glad to see in her recent video that Miss Brown has received medical treatment from her local medical facility and wish her the best. pic.twitter.com/SoCvwxdrGc

— Gorilla Glue (@GorillaGlue) February 8, 2021

"We are aware of the situation and we are very sorry to hear about the unfortunate incident that Miss Brown experienced using our Spray Adhesive on her hair," the statement said.

"This is a unique situation because this product is not indicated for use in or on hair as it is considered permanent."

It added: "We are glad to see in her recent video that Miss Brown has received medical treatment from her local medical facility and wish her the best."

Gorilla Glue added that the product's warning label says "Do not swallow. Do not get in eyes, on skin or on clothing" and that it is used for craft, home, auto or office projects to mount things to surfaces such as paper, cardboard, wood, laminate and fabric.

Gorilla Glue initially reached out to Brown on Twitter after her plight went viral on the platform.

"Hi there, we are sorry to learn about your experience! We do not recommend using our products in hair as they are considered permanent. You can try soaking the affected area in warm, soapy water or applying rubbing alcohol to the area," the company tweeted in response to a Twitter user's post of Brown's video.

I’m glad mfs actually supporting her thru this. When I watched the video the second time it was hard to laugh cause I could tell shorty genuinely didn’t know she had put one of the worlds most powerful adhesives in her shit. I hope she recovers well 🙏🏾 #gorillagluegirl

— Chance The Rapper (@chancetherapper) February 6, 2021

Many others offered her support using the hashtag #gorillagluegirl. Among them was Chance The Rapper, who tweeted: "I'm glad mfs actually supporting her thru this."

He added: "When I watched the video the second time it was hard to laugh cause I could tell shorty genuinely didn't know she had put one of the worlds most powerful adhesives in her sh*t. I hope she recovers well."

Brown set up a GoFundMe page on Monday, which quickly exceeded its $1,500 target. She has been contacted for comment.

Spray cans stock photo
Stock photo. Gorilla Glue said it is "very sorry" to hear about a woman who used the company's spray adhesive as hair spray. Getty