Kim Kardashian Praises Jared Kushner's Prison Reform Efforts After Talks About Freeing Alice Johnson

Kim Kardashian West, who has been speaking to President Donald Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner about clemency for a 62-year-old woman imprisoned for life, praised Kushner's prison reform efforts in a new interview and said she is behind them.

"I've been in communication with the White House and trying to bring her case to the president's desk and figure out how we can get her out. Jared Kushner, who I have spoken to, has been really working on criminal justice reform bills,” Kardashian West told Mic in an interview posted Wednesday.

Related: Jared Kushner's Closeness to Trump Could Help Finally Deliver Prison Reform, Former U.S. Attorney Says

The reality television star has been conversing with Kushner and his wife Ivanka Trump since October about clemency for Alice Johnson, who has been in federal prison for more than two decades for a non-violent drug offense: playing a role in facilitating communications in a drug trafficking case.

“I know they're internally talking about it, so that's such a huge step from where we started with that not even being on their radar,” Kardashian West said of Johnson's case.

Asked what she thought about criticism around her working with the Trump administration, Kardashian West again pointed to the White House's criminal justice reform work, headed by Kushner.

“For me, I'm just focused on criminal justice reform and helping one person at a time," she said. "And so far, the White House has been really receptive to my calls, and I'm grateful for that. And I'm not going to stop that because people personally don't like Trump.”

The House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday advanced a bipartisan prison reform bill that Kushner has rallied for, and that had previously been postponed. But criminal justice advocates, including the ACLU, criticized the legislation for not addressing sentencing reform.

“Supporters of the legislation have used the phrase ‘something is better than nothing,'” Jesselyn McCurdy, deputy director of the ACLU's Washington legislative office, said in a statement. “No meaningful reform to our criminal justice system can be made without addressing how people enter prison and how they can rebuild their lives after—and this legislation does neither.”

Kushner has suggested that prison reform should be a first step and that if approved, will build momentum for the more polarizing sentencing reform.