Man Intentionally Submerges Car in River to Fill Radiator With Water

A man in Washington state has reportedly told the authorities that he intentionally submerged his car in a river so that he could fill up its radiator with water.

Emergency crews in the city of Yakima, Washington, responded to calls at around 11am on Tuesday from multiple local residents reporting seeing a blue Chevrolet SUV in the water of the Yakima River, according to local NBC affiliate NEWS4SA.

Deputies from the Yakima County Sheriff's Office responded to the scene and found the vehicle in the water and the car's owner nearby, before emergency crews then towed it back out of the river.

The authorities told the local station that the owner of the car told police that he intentionally drove the vehicle into the river on Tuesday morning so that he could get water into its radiator after he had replaced the thermostat.

According to HowStuffWorks, it is possible to put water into a car's radiator to stop it from overheating, but that "it's preferable to add a mixture of coolant and water because plain water can boil before the proper coolant will boil, causing your engine to overheat."

It advises people to fill the "radiator with a mixture of 60 percent coolant and 40 percent water," while only topping up "the reservoir to about an inch of the top, so there aren't any air pockets."

Police and emergency crews are often called out to incidents of cars and other vehicles driving into bodies of water, but this case was unusual as the man admitted to the authorities that he did it intentionally.

A similar incident occurred in India in 2019 when a young man who received a BMW for his 22nd birthday pushed it into a river because it wasn't the Jaguar he had been hoping for.

Police divers in the state of Haryana in India managed to recover the BMW from a patch of tall grass it was moored on, as officials said the owner deliberately pushed his new car into the canal after receiving it from his father, who is believed to be a prosperous local landowner.

Meanwhile, a woman, Emma Lavelle, in Salford, England, was charged money by Uber in April after the driver of the ride-share vehicle she was in drove into the Bridgewater Canal waterway after following instructions on his navigation software.

Neither the woman or the driver were injured in the incident, but when she got home, Lavelle received a £29.31 ($40.31) charge for the Uber, which was only refunded after it was reported in the news.

Newsweek has contacted the Yakima County Sheriff's Office for comment.

Car driven into river
File photo of a car flooded. A man in Washington state has reportedly told the authorities that he intentionally submerged his car in a river so that he could fill up its radiator with water. lilly3/iStock / Getty Images Plus