Meghan Markle Calls Mail on Sunday 'Daily Fail' After Court Victory Over Newspaper

Meghan Markle has won her tabloid privacy lawsuit—and namechecked the newspaper's owner in a strongly worded statement.

The Duchess of Sussex was handed victory at the end of a two-year saga that at one stage left her fearing she would lose her pregnancy with second child Lilibet Mountbatten-Windsor.

The appeal hearing also saw her forced to apologize for misleading the court over her co-operation with the authors of biography Finding Freedom.

The case revolved around a letter she sent her father asking him to stop talking to the media, which was published by The Mail on Sunday in February 2019.

In a statement released to Newsweek, Meghan said: "This is a victory not just for me, but for anyone who has ever felt scared to stand up for what's right. While this win is precedent setting, what matters most is that we are now collectively brave enough to reshape a tabloid industry that conditions people to be cruel, and profits from the lies and pain that they create."

Meghan originally won a resounding victory in her case in February without a trial but the newspaper appealed, opening a window for an ex-aide who accused her of bullying to expose her private messages.

Emails and texts detailed how she had written the letter to Thomas Markle knowing it might leak to the media and had addressed it to "Daddy" so that if it became public, it would pull at the "heart strings."

However, the disclosures did not sway the Court of Appeal who ruled the letter remained private.

Meghan Markle at Global Citizen
Meghan Markle speaks at Global Citizen Live in New York on September 25. The Duchess of Sussex has won her tabloid privacy lawsuit after a bruising two-year battle. Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Global Citizen

A judgement handed down on December 2 read: "Essentially, whilst it might have been proportionate to disclose and publish a very small part of the Letter to rebut inaccuracies in the People Article, it was not necessary to deploy half the contents of the Letter as [The Mail on Sunday] did."

Meghan said in her statement: "Today, the courts ruled in my favor—again—cementing that The Mail on Sunday, owned by Lord Jonathan Rothermere, has broken the law. The courts have held the defendant to account, and my hope is that we all begin to do the same.

"Because as far removed as it may seem from your personal life, it's not. Tomorrow it could be you. These harmful practices don't happen once in a blue moon—they are a daily fail that divide us, and we all deserve better."

The reference to a "daily fail" is a nod to a nickname given to the tabloid's sister title The Daily Mail.

The judgement read: "As the Articles themselves demonstrate, and as the judge found, the primary purpose of the Articles was not to publish Mr. Markle's responses to the inaccurate allegations against him in the People Article.

"The true purpose of the publication was, as the first 4 lines of the Articles said: to reveal for the first time [to the world] the "[t]he full content of a sensational letter written by [the Duchess] to her estranged father shortly after her wedding."

"The contents of the Letter were private when it was written and when it was published, even if the claimant, it now appears, realized that her father might leak its contents to the media."

Update 12/02/21, 6:50 a.m. ET: This article was updated to add a new picture.

Meghan Markle's Full Statement on Tabloid Privacy Win

"This is a victory not just for me, but for anyone who has ever felt scared to stand up for what's right. While this win is precedent setting, what matters most is that we are now collectively brave enough to reshape a tabloid industry that conditions people to be cruel, and profits from the lies and pain that they create.

"From day one, I have treated this lawsuit as an important measure of right versus wrong. The defendant has treated it as a game with no rules.

"The longer they dragged it out, the more they could twist facts and manipulate the public (even during the appeal itself), making a straightforward case extraordinarily convoluted in order to generate more headlines and sell more newspapers—a model that rewards chaos above truth.

"In the nearly three years since this began, I have been patient in the face of deception, intimidation, and calculated attacks.

"Today, the courts ruled in my favor—again—cementing that The Mail on Sunday, owned by Lord Jonathan Rothermere, has broken the law. The courts have held the defendant to account, and my hope is that we all begin to do the same.

"Because as far removed as it may seem from your personal life, it's not. Tomorrow it could be you. These harmful practices don't happen once in a blue moon—they are a daily fail that divide us, and we all deserve better."