Moms Will Run Out of Baby Formula in One Month: 'It's Nowhere to Be Found'

Some mothers in Pennsylvania said that they will soon run out of baby formula as they continue to struggle to feed their babies amid a nationwide shortage.

Deanna Tomaselli from Ross Township said that in the last week the formula that her 11-month-old daughter eats is "nowhere to be found," Pittsburgh's NPR news station WESA reported on Friday.

I have enough for probably a month or so, but I don't know what's going to happen after that.
Erin Arnold, mother

Erin Arnold, a mother of a 6-month-old who lives in Jefferson County, is experiencing a similar problem, saying, "I have enough for probably a month or so, but I don't know what's going to happen after that."

The baby formula shortage began late last year due to supply chain disruptions caused by COVID-19 when ingredients, labor and transportation were lacking.

Moms Run Out of Baby Formula
Some mothers in Pennsylvania said that they will soon run out of baby formula as they continue to struggle amid a nationwide shortage. Above, baby formula is offered for sale at a big-box store on January 13, 2022, in Chicago, Illinois. Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images

However, the situation was exacerbated after Abbott Nutrition recalled several major brands and shut down its Sturgis, Michigan, factory. The recall came after the FDA said that several babies were hospitalized and two infants died of a rare bacterial infection that was linked to Abbott-manufactured products.

"We know that our recent recall caused additional stress and anxiety in an already challenging situation of a global supply shortage. We are working hard to help moms, dads and caregivers get the high-quality nutrition they need for their babies," Abbott said in a statement in April.

We have family members in like seven different states looking for it, mailing it to us if they can find it.
Mollie Lust, mother

Meanwhile, an Observatory Hill neighborhood resident, Mollie Lust, said that the formula recall made her throw away much of the formula she had bought.

"We have family members in like seven different states looking for it, mailing it to us if they can find it," she said, according to WESA.

While the shortage in formulas has prompted some discussions about nourishment alternatives, experts warned parents against creating their own formula at home or diluting one to avoid harming babies.

"I think people should not be quick to say, 'Oh, you can breastfeed,' or 'Oh, you can make your own formula.' Because, number one, I don't think making your own formula is safe," Tomaselli said, according to WESA, adding that she is unable to breastfeed her baby.

"I wanted to, but I couldn't. And it's like 11 months later, I can't magically make milk appear today. So, I think people need to just not be judgmental and understand that formula is essential for babies' growth and development," she said.

The nationwide shortage impacted parents who said they panicked as they tried to find baby formula, with some participating in Facebook groups where stock updates are posted, while others drove long distances to obtain the products.

"Having to drive one to two hours away from your own home in hopes of finding formula for your child, then having no luck, makes you feel so guilty," Kenzie Martin, 29, of White Plains, New York, told Newsweek this week. She described the "real panic" to source formula for her 4-month-old.