Rashida Tlaib Slams 'Gross' SCOTUS Decision on Eviction Moratorium, Protecting the 'Rich'

Congresswoman Rashida Tlaib slammed the Supreme Court's decision to overturn the Biden administration's eviction moratorium Friday evening, calling it "gross" and "partisan."

Tlaib, a Democrat from Michigan, accused the Supreme Court of protecting "the interests of the rich & corporations at the expense of working people" in a tweet.

"The Court's gross, partisan decision will throw millions out of their homes in the middle of a surging pandemic," she wrote.

SCOTUS has always protected the interests of the rich & corporations at the expense of working people. This is just another example. The Court's gross, partisan decision will throw millions out of their homes in the middle of a surging pandemic.

Congress must act now. https://t.co/qKJnE43rEN

— Rashida Tlaib (@RashidaTlaib) August 27, 2021

Tlaib and more than 60 House Democrats signed a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer urging action to extend the eviction moratorium until the end of the pandemic. The letter called "the impending eviction crisis" a matter of public health and safety that needs an urgent legislative solution.

"Allowing an eviction crisis to take hold will only erase the gains we've made and put our recovery further out of reach," the letter read.

Without the eviction moratorium, there will be an increased spread of the COVID-19 virus, more deaths, and more "community wide trauma."

Other progressive lawmakers have also criticized the Supreme Court over the decision.

Cori Bush—the Missouri Democratic congresswoman who led a sleep-in on the steps of the U.S. Capitol urging the Biden administration to extend the moratorium when it was set to expire August 1—wrote on Twitter that Congress must act immediately "for every unhoused or soon to be unhoused person in our districts."

"We were outside the Capitol for 5 days. Rain. Heat. Cold," Bush wrote. "If they think this partisan ruling is going to stop us from fighting to keep people housed, they're wrong."

We were outside the Capitol for 5 days. Rain. Heat. Cold.

If they think this partisan ruling is going to stop us from fighting to keep people housed, they're wrong.

Congress needs to act immediately. For every unhoused or soon to be unhoused person in our districts. https://t.co/Boi3rUaZ4Y

— Cori Bush (@CoriBush) August 27, 2021

On Thursday, the Supreme Court blocked the federal eviction moratorium in a 6-3 decision, ruling the CDC did not have the legal authority to block evictions and that Congress must authorize the moratorium for it to continue.

"The CDC has imposed a nationwide moratorium on evictions in reliance on a decades-old statute that authorizes it to implement measures like fumigation and pest extermination," the decision read. "It strains credulity to believe that this statute grants the CDC the sweeping authority that it asserts."

The liberal wing of the high court, Associate Justices Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan, dissented. Breyer wrote that "the public interest strongly favors respecting the CDC's judgment at this moment, when over 90 percent of counties are experiencing high transmission rates."

White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki said in a statement the Biden administration was "disappointed" by the decision.

"Families will face the painful impact of evictions, and communities across the country will face greater risk of exposure to COVID-19," the statement read.

Some states including California, Maryland and New Jersey have implemented their own temporary eviction moratoriums to protect residents.

By the end of July, only 11 percent of the $46.5 billion in federal rental assistance authorized by lawmakers earlier in 2021 had been issued, according to the Treasury Department.

Newsweek reached out to Tlaib and Bush's office, as well as the Supreme Court, for comment, but had not heard back by publication. This story will be updated with any response.

Rep. Rashida Tlaib
Rep. Rashida Tlaib, a Michigan Democrat, blasted the Supreme Court for protecting “the interests of the rich & corporations at the expense of working people” following their ruling blocking the eviction moratorium. Here, Tlaib attends a hearing in the Rayburn House Office Building on January 9, 2020. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images