Trump Touts His Intelligence at Ohio Rally: 'Now They Don't Call Me Stupid'

Former President Donald Trump attempted to tout his own intelligence at a rally in Ohio on Saturday, claiming that people no longer call him "stupid" after he passed a cognitive test in 2018.

Speaking at an event in Delaware County, Ohio, the former president told his supporters that he did not like being called stupid and that he wanted to prove his capabilities. He referenced having a conversation with Texas GOP Representative Ronny Jackson, who served as Trump's White House physician, in which he asked if there was a "test" he could take.

"I said to doc Ronny...I don't like when people call me stupid. I have a great heritage. An uncle who is a great, great genius. A father who is a genius. I don't like to be called stupid," Trump said. "Is there a test or something I can take to prove to these radical left maniacs I am much smarter than them? And he said, 'Sir, there is a test. It's called an X test.'"

The test that Trump is referring to is called the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MOCA). The assessment is not a test of IQ, but is instead designed to detect whether a person has cognitive impairments, such as dementia or memory loss.

Jackson administered him the test in 2018 and said he scored 100 percent. However, experts noted that MOCA gave no indication of Trump's actual intelligence. Several of the test questions appear simple, such as asking the person to draw a clock showing a specific time in order to gage for signs of cognitive difficulty, Newsweek previously noted.

Trump Intelligence
Former President Donald Trump attempted to tout his own intelligence at a rally in Ohio on Saturday, claiming that people no longer call him "stupid" after he took a cognitive test in 2018. Above, Trump speaks during a rally in Delaware, Ohio, on April 23. Megan JELINGER / AFP/Getty Images

"The fact that anybody gets a perfect score on the MOCA suggests that they are not having changes in cognitive function associated with early signs of dementia," Columbia University psychiatrist Dr. Paul Appelbaum told Newsweek in 2018. "It can be very reassuring in that regard. But it's important to recognize that that's all it tells you."

Nonetheless, Trump repeatedly touted his perfect score by stating that he "aced" the test. The former president has also referred to himself several times as a "very stable genius." On Saturday, Trump doubled down on those claims, adding that, "now, they don't call me stupid."

Also during the rally, Trump referenced remarks he made earlier this week in which he said he would rather be called a dictator than a dumb person.

"Which would you rather be, a dumb person or a dictator?" Trump asked Thursday night at a conference in Florida, Insider reported. "Perhaps a dictator would be better. I don't want to be a dumb person."

Newsweek contacted Trump's office for additional comment.