Woman Slammed for Wearing an 'Off-White' Dress to Sister's Wedding

In a post going viral on social media, the internet has slammed a woman for wearing an "off-white" dress to her sister's wedding.

Published on Reddit's r/AmITheA**hole forum, a woman under the username u/turkish_queen shared her story to receive feedback from the "AITA" community. The viral post has over 6,000 upvotes and 2,000 comments.

The original poster (OP) began her post by explaining that her sister recently got married. The dress code instructed guests to wear formal dresses and tuxedos and to not wear the color white. OP described the dress as a "floor length silver-ish dress with a lead-like design." She wrote that her sister had a traditional Turkish wedding where the bride wears red with limited white and gold colors.

Woman slammed for wearing "off-white" dress wedding
Above, a groom embraces a bride carrying a flower bouquet while holding her hand. Published to Reddit's r/AmITheA**hole forum, a woman has been slammed for wearing an "off-white" dress to her sister's wedding. Hreni/iStock / Getty Images Plus

OP wrote, "So jumping to the day of the wedding I show up in my dress with my boyfriend. Everything seems fine up until the reception afterwards where my sister acts somewhat cold to me after I come up and congratulate her and her husband. My sister tells me that she doesn't approve of my dress and that it would be best if I left."

"I asked her what was wrong about it as it fit both requirements she had set for the dresses worn. She told me that it looked as if I was attempting to upstage her at her own wedding with my dress of choice. Not wanting to cause a scene my BF and I opted to not argue and leave," she continued.

While heading out the door, her parents stopped her to ask where she was going. When she explained the situation to them, her mother sided with her sister while her father sided with OP. She's conflicted if she should apologize to her sister.

OP posted a link for everyone to see the dress, and many commenters edited their comment to call her out on her choice of apparel.

Newsweek reached out to u/turkish_queen for comment.

When is it acceptable to wear white to a wedding?

Wedding traditions can be different for everyone. In some cultures, brides wear white so typical etiquette is for guests to avoid the color in order to not upstage or upset the bride, according to theknot.com.

When is it acceptable to wear white to a wedding? According to Brides magazine, people can wear white to a wedding if:

  • The bride wants their wedding party to wear white and you are in the bridal party
  • The dress code is an "all-white" wedding
  • The dress has subtle hints of white, then it is likely acceptable to wear.

Newsweek has published several articles regarding weddings, including a "bridezilla" who was slammed online for expecting guests to pay for their own meal at their wedding, a man who was bashed for banning his fiancée's kids from his wedding and a sibling who was slammed for bashing on their brother's "not traditional" wedding.

Redditor reactions

"[You're the a**hole] So tired of people playing coy when they wear off-white dresses. That's not appropriate for most weddings and you should have checked. Given you already seem to have bad blood with her, I'm inclined to think you knew this would upset her," u/Commercial-Pear-543 wrote, receiving the top comment of over 7,000 upvotes.

"This looks like it was straight from a bridal catalog, and is definitely not appropriate without pre-approval. YTA, this seems like an effort to one up what ever spat you were having with your sister," u/jewelsandbones said.

U/alien_overlord_1001 commented, "[You're the a**hole] Now I've seen the dress - seriously what were you thinking? Yeah I would be pretty annoyed with you too. This dress is not for a wedding - unless it's your wedding."

"I saw the picture. I was leaning towards you being the ah because silver is too close to white to begin with, but after seeing the dress, it could have been suitable for the bride. You tried to dodge the spirit of her request with a 'technically its not white' line of bs," u/ApprehensiveTruth330 explained.