El Chapo Is Going Down

How much El Chapo will reveal and what will become of his cartel are the two outstanding questions now that his fate is all but sealed.

Mexico Divides and Conquers the Cartels

Events in Mexico's drug war grow more horrific by the day. The recent killing of 72 migrants and a shootout between the Army and 27 cartel gunmen prompted a warning last week from Secretary of State Hillary Clinton that Mexico's cartels are adopting tactics akin to those of an "insurgency."

Off To The Graveyard

And so, an era is over. After more than a decade of delighting English football fans at Manchester United and Spanish aficionados at Real Madrid, David Beckham is coming to America. But is it the right move? Responding to a reported $250 million, five-year deal with the L.A. Galaxy, The Independent of London blared leaving real life for la-la-land.Most football pundits would argue that Beckham has been in La-la Land for some time now. At the very least, he's become too big for his boots. In...

Clean Nukes Go Public

The darkest side of nuclear power, as North Korea just dramatically demonstrated, is that its waste can be made into bomb fuel. Current nuclear reactors are powered by a mix of two isotopes of uranium that produce a third isotope--uranium 239, which ultimately decays into bomb-grade plutonium. Since 1992, Thorium Power Ltd. has been working on a new kind of fuel that mixes uranium with thorium, an element named after the Norse god of thunder, in a process that produces no uranium 239. The goal...

Growing Pains

An Iraqi soldier is running across the street, an automatic weapon in one hand, firing blindly down the alley towards the enemy, apparently unaware of his fellow soldiers in the line of fire. "Somebody slap that f---er," yells U.S. Army Capt. Josh Brandon. The Iraqi, grinning, safely reaches Brandon on the far side of the square. The captain isn't smiling. About 45 minutes into what would turn into a two-and-a-half-hour firefight with suspected terrorists in the central Baghdad neighborhood of...

Periscope

Overshadowed by Lebanon, the violence in Iraq has hit new highs. Attacks in the towns of Kufah and Mahmudiyah left more than 100 dead last week, while Baghdad alone saw a 40 percent spike in bombings and shootings. A United Nations report confirmed the "upward trend," stating that nearly 6,000 civilians were killed in May and June, renewing fears that Iraq is descending into civil war.Baghdad's Central Morgue--which takes in about 80 bodies a day--has meanwhile become a battleground. It's...

Counting Corpses

The morgue is several blocks away, but the stench of rotting flesh wafts through the streets of the northern Baghdad neighborhood of Bab Al-Muadham. The odor is so powerful that doctors, police and cleaning workers cover their mouths and noses as they walk through the halls of the one-story building, struggling to avoid slipping on the black, oily film that covers the floors. Visitors who come in search of missing family members carry burning paper in hopes of masking the smell. Employees dump...

'Ready to Do Our Job'

The tidy green grass, the sun beating down on the back of the neck, excited spectators spilling onto the track encircling the field—it felt a bit like a high-school field day. On Thursday, the southern Iraqi province of Muthanna celebrated the handover of security responsibilities from coalition forces to Iraqi troops in a soccer stadium outside the provincial capital of Samawah. The first transition of its kind in the country—Coalition troops will remain in Muthanna, but only in an...

'He's Not Afraid'

After nearly 10 months of court proceedings, Saddam Hussein's chaotic trial is finally drawing to a close. Charged with ordering the murder of 148 Shiites from the village of Dujail in 1982, the deposed Iraqi dictator has been prone to angry outbursts in the courtroom, often simply using the trial as a forum to vent about America. Several witnesses have failed to appear on their designated day; others have simply been discredited. The chief judge resigned, while the prosecutor has been accused...

Continental Crisis

Rising out of the sand near a residential suburb of Dakar, the Demba Diop Stadium was beginning to fill up. Thousands of Senegalese fans sporting green, red and yellow national football shirts waited patiently in two orderly lines, while a band played West African tunes and groups of young boys sold bags of drinking water in the scorching spring heat. Less than two hours later, after enjoying their country's thrilling 6-1 victory over Liberia, the fans poured out of the stadium with an air of...

Young Guns

Judging from the headlines, you might have thought a prophet had passed away. IS THERE LIFE AFTER ROO? Read one. A KILLER BLOW, lamented another. The Mirror best summed up the national mood: OUR ROOINATION. Wayne Rooney, the star of the English team, had fractured a metatarsal during a Premier League match last month. Although the England squad boasts world-class names like David Beckham, Michael Owen and Steven Gerrard, the country's World Cup chances suddenly seemed to have deflated like a...

Football's Big Fear

They descended on Briesen in the middle of the night, about a hundred in all. In the cold of late November, in the woods surrounding the little German border town, the rumble began. By the time anti-hooligan police arrived, the German and Polish football thugs had slashed each other with knives and inflicted bruises with clubs. The message was clear, police say: this was a "warm-up" for the World Cup.It seems hooligans are back. In their 1980s heyday, football thugs ran rampant across Europe....

The Last Word: Javad Zarif--Finding the 'Missing Link'

Last Tuesday fiery Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad proudly boasted that his country had joined "the club of nuclear countries" after successfully enriching uranium. The move defied U.N. calls for Tehran to suspend its nuclear program, and came on the eve of an inspection visit by Mohamed ElBaradei, head of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Even with the threat of U.N. sanctions looming and rumors of a U.S. military strike swirling, Ahmadinejad vowed that Iran would continue its...

A Day in Buenos Aires

It may be known as the Paris of South America, but in many respects, Buenos Aires has more going for it than its European counterpart. The peso--at three to the dollar--makes everything from steaks to suits a bargain for most visitors, and the city's lively Latin vibe easily beats the smug attitude of Parisians. Oh, and they tango there, too. Here is an idiosyncratic guide for what to do and where to go: Stroll through the cobbled streets of San Telmo and admire the colonial architecture. The...

The Last Word Ashraf Qazi: 'Serious'--Or A Civil War?

Since the February bombing of the sacred Askariya Mosque in Samarra, Iraq has been consumed by sectarian violence. Hundreds have died in reprisal killings carried out by Sunni and Shia militias, while the insurgency continues to hamper efforts to form a government. But despite the evident chaos, U.S. leaders continue to insist they're seeing progress. PresidentGeorge W. Bush last week hailed the city of Tall Afar as a "concrete example of success in Iraq." Former Iraqi prime minister Ayad...

The Last Word: John Edwards--'Real Moral Leadership'

Republican opposition killed the proposed takeover of some American port facilities by a Dubai company, but congressional Democrats were the first to fan the flames of the controversy. Eager to capitalize on President George W. Bush's weakness in the polls, and with midterm elections looming later in the year, opposition-party members were clearly looking to regain some ground on national security. Former senator John Edwards, a vice presidential candidate in 2004, has similarly been laying the...

Can Préval Prevail?

In the end, it came down to a simple choice: declare Rene Préval the winner of the Haitian presidential elections or watch the country descend into violence. Street demonstrations in the capital of Port-au-Prince had already followed a peaceful—albeit somewhat disorganized—vote on Feb. 7. As allegations of fraud began to gain traction and Préval's tally slipped below the 50 percent required to avoid a runoff, the prospect of violence became all too real. "If they put the fix in for...

Waiting in Misery

Samuel Bien Aimé woke up at 4 a.m. Tuesday morning ready to vote. After trekking 2.5 miles to the nearest polling station in Port-au-Prince, the capital of Haiti, and standing patiently in line for nearly six hours, Bien Aimé finally cast his ballot for presidential candidate Rene Preval. "I waited in misery for this," said the smiling 28-year-old as he left the polling station near the capital's Cité Soleil slum.As a country, Haiti is no stranger to such sentiments. The country's...

Post-Saddam Art

American curator Peter Hastings Falk got the idea for an exhibit of post-Saddam Hussein Iraqi art when he saw a photograph of a painting over a mural of the deposed dictator in Baghdad. "My first thought was, 'This guy's got guts'," he says. "I have to contact [him]." The "guy'" was Esam Pasha, a Baghdad-based artist whose works are now featured in "Ashes to Art: The Iraqi Phoenix" at the Pomegranate Gallery in New York City through Feb. 22. After two years of e-mail between Falk and Esam, a...

The Great King Khan

Shahrukh Khan has acted in nearly 60 films and produced more than a handful of his own. But at 40 years, he's just hitting his stride. "Age hasn't hit me yet," says the father of two. "Only when my knees are in pain, or when I run out of breath from going upstairs, does it remind me that I'm 40." His career is certainly still in ascendance: He's got four new films slated forrelease this year, and his latest, "Paheli," is now India's contender for the best-foreign-film Oscar. NEWSWEEK's Malcolm...

Beauty in the Beasts

It's difficult to spot a diamond in the rough. It's even harder to see the beauty in, say, a pig. But football--known as the beautiful game--has, on occasion, transformed what some might consider rather ordinary beasts into priceless gems. A short, stout and cocky Diego Maradona emerged from the Buenos Aires slums to become a god on the pitch, his ability to sweep defenders aside truly Biblical. Zinedine Zidane, born to Algerian immigrants in the rough banlieues of Marseille, led France to...

The Beat Goes On

A year ago it was difficult to find a nightclub in Latin America that wasn't pulsating to "Gasolina," a raunchy number by reggaeton star Daddy Yankee. Bootleg CDs of the tune were on sale at street stalls from Santo Domingo to Tijuana. In the United States, though, the 28-year-old Puerto Rican was still a no-name outside of urban, largely Hispanic areas like the Bronx. Today the feverish chants of "A ella le gusta la gasolina/Dame mas gasolina" ("She likes gasoline/Give me more gasoline") blast...

The Beat Goes On

A year ago, it was difficult to find a nightclub in Latin America that wasn't pulsating to "Gasolina," a raunchy number by reggaeton star Daddy Yankee. Bootleg CDs of the tune were on sale at street stalls from Santo Domingo to Tijuana. In the United States, however, the 28-year-old Puerto Rican was still a no-name outside of urban, largely Hispanic areas like the Bronx. Today the feverish chants--a call and response between Daddy Yankee and his female chorus--of "A ella le gusta la...

Pages