Donald Trump Calls Georgia Election Law 'Too Weak': 'Hope the RINOs Are Happy'

Former U.S. President Donald Trump has criticized Georgia's recently passed election law as "too weak."

"Hope the RINOs are happy," Trump wrote in a Tuesday statement criticizing the law. RINO is an initialism for Republicans in Name Only. The initialism is an insult for GOP members who allegedly don't represent the political party's values.

Georgia's new election law limits absentee ballots and early voting, restricts ballot drop boxes and imposes tough new voter ID requirements. It also allows for the Republican-controlled State Election Board to take over any county election boards that it deems problematic.

"Georgia's election reform law is far too weak and soft to ensure real ballot integrity," Trump wrote in his Tuesday statement. Trump also blasted the state for giving people "far too many days" in which to vote.

"Election Day is supposed to be Election Day, not Election Week or Election Month. Too much 'mischief' can happen during this very long period of time," Trump wrote. "You saw that in the 2020 Presidential Election. How's Ruby Freeman doing?"

Donald Trump Georgia election law weak RINOs
Former U.S. President Donald Trump has criticized Georgia's recently passed election law as "too weak." "Hope the RINOs are happy," Trump wrote in a statement criticizing the law. RINO is an initialism for Republicans in Name Only, an insult for GOP members who allegedly don't represent the political party's values. In this photo, Trump addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) held in the Hyatt Regency on February 28, 2021 in Orlando, Florida. Joe Raedle/Getty

Freeman is an elderly election worker that Trump falsely accused of committing massive voter fraud in Georgia after he lost Georgia in the 2020 presidential election. Trump mentioned Freeman's name 18 times in his January 2 phone call to Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger. In the call, Trump asked Raffensperger to illegally alter the election's results and said that he would "take on" Freeman, if given the chance.

Freeman's family reportedly faced harassment, unwanted pizza deliveries and death threats after Trump and his legal team continually mentioned her name as a fraudster, according to NPR.

Since losing Georgia, Trump has repeatedly criticized Raffensperger and the state's Republican Governor Brian Kemp. He continued to criticize them both in his Tuesday statement.

Trump's statement said that the two "should have eliminated no-excuse, widespread mass Mail-In Voting, gotten rid of the dangerous and insecure Drop-Boxes, and should have kept and EXPANDED Signature Verification to do matches against the historical vote file, among other things."

"Hope the RINOs are happy," Trump added.

In his statement, Trump also accused Kemp of having "caved to the radical left-wing woke mob" for allowing that state to maintain weekend voting, suggesting the left would call Kemp "racist" if he ended the practice.

"Well, he kept it, and they still call him racist!" Trump wrote.

Georgia Republicans had initially proposed a limit to early voting on weekends. However, many Black churches complained that doing so would impact their "souls to the polls" initiatives that help congregants vote after church. Georgia's current law now requires counties to offer two days of Saturday voting and allows them to offer two Sundays as well.

After the 2020 election, the Trump campaign and Republican officials filed over 60 court cases alleging massive voter fraud, although only in the states that Biden won. Nearly all of the cases were dismissed or withdrawn from courts due to lack of evidence.

Two former Trump Administration heads have also said that there's no evidence that the election was stolen. Both former Attorney General William Barr, the head of the Department of Justice and the Department of Homeland Security, and Chris Krebs, the former head of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), the federal agency in charge of maintaining election security, said so.

Numerous Democrats and corporations have criticized Georgia's new law as an undemocratic means of voter suppression. Kemp and other state Republicans claim that it will actually expand voting.

Newsweek contacted Trump's office for comment.