Full List of 31 Republicans Who Voted Against Military Aid for Ukraine

The Senate passed a $1.5 trillion appropriations package on Thursday that included $13.6 billion in emergency humanitarian and military aid for Ukraine amid the ongoing Russian invasion.

The legislation won bipartisan support but 31 Republican senators voted against the measure, with Senator Mitt Romney (R-UT) saying he supported helping Ukraine but arguing the process was rushed. Other Republicans voiced similar concerns.

The Russian invasion of Ukraine has now been going on for more than two weeks with Ukrainian forces offering strong resistance. Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky has repeatedly called for more international assistance.

About half of the $13.6 billion will be spent on military aid for Ukraine as well as the cost of sending U.S. troops to NATO countries in Europe amid the crisis. The rest will be used for humanitarian aid and economic assistance. That aid is just one aspect of the much larger bill, which will fund the U.S. government and avoid a shutdown.

The senators who voted against the bill were:

Marsha Blackburn of Tennessee, John Boozman of Arkansas, Mike Braun of Indiana, Richard Burr of North Carolina, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Tom Cotton of Arkansas, Kevin Cramer of North Dakota, Mike Crapo of Idaho, Ted Cruz of Texas, Steve Daines of Montana, Deb Fischer of Nebraska, Bill Hagerty of Tennessee, Josh Hawley of Missouri, John Hoeven of North Dakota, Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, John Kennedy of Louisiana, James Lankford of Oklahoma, Mike Lee of Utah, Cynthia Lummis of Wyoming, Roger Marshall of Kansas, Rand Paul of Kentucky, Jim Risch of Idaho, Mitt Romney of Utah, Mike Rounds of South Dakota, Marco Rubio of Florida, Ben Sasse of Nebraska, Rick Scott of Florida, Tim Scott of South Carolina, Dan Sullivan of Arkansas, Thom Tillis of North Carolina and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania.

Romney issued a statement after the vote, saying: "We have got to end the absurd process of jamming through last-minute, trillion-dollar, thousand-page spending bills without meaningful input from more than a handful of members.

"Forcing us to swallow the bad to get the good is concerning, unsustainable, and no way to govern over the long-term. While I strongly support providing Ukrainians desperately needed aid, I ultimately could not support the rest of this bloated spending bill for the aforementioned reasons."

Blackburn took to Twitter to explain her decision to vote against the bill.

"Under the Democrats' leadership, inflation has reached a 40-year high and gas is more expensive than it was in 2008, at the height of the financial crisis. With one vote, the left was trying to smuggle through more wasteful spending," Blackburn wrote.

Blackburn said that the people of Tennessee were "tired of radicals in Washington wasting our hard-earned tax dollars, which is why I voted against this reckless spending bill."

Rubio also expressed his support for Ukraine but criticized Democrats for other aspects of the $1.5 trillion spending bill.

"We should have passed funding for Ukraine two weeks ago," Rubio tweeted. "But instead, Democrats held it hostage so it could ram through thousands of earmarks, green new deal programs, the hiring of 10,000 IRS agents & other woke priorities buried in thousands of pages. This is a ridiculous process."

Rick Scott also took aim at "earmarks" in the spending bill.

"For the first time in over a decade, this 'budget' includes 1,000s of member earmarks— wasteful pet projects," Scott tweeted, adding he was "Proud to join @SenatorBraun to fight this reckless spending."

Braun called the spending bill "a disgrace."

"[I]t spends more money on swamp earmarks than it does on humanitarian aid to Ukraine, and while inflation hits record highs D.C.'s answer is to spend another trillion dollars we don't have. NO, NO, NO," Braun tweeted.

Lee reportedly voted against the bill after the Senate rejected an amendment that would have prohibited funding for COVID-19 vaccine mandates.

The bill now heads to President Joe Biden's desk and he is set to sign it into law.

A US Flag Flies at the Capitol
U.S. flag flies in front of the US Capitol in Washington, D.C. on January 14, 2022. The Senate passed a spending bill on Thursday that included $13.6 billion in aid for Ukraine. MANDEL NGAN / AFP/Getty Images