Jan 6. Hearing Updates: What to Expect From July Hearings

Live Updates
  • The fifth January 6 hearing from the House Select Committee concluded Thursday evening.
  • This hearing focused on former President Donald Trump's efforts to pressure Department of Justice officials to change the results of the 2020 Presidential election.
  • Witnesses included former acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen, former acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue and former assistant Attorney General of the Office of Legal Counsel Steven Engel.
  • Trump pressured Rosen, who took over the DOJ after Bill Barr resigned, to "just say the election was corrupt."
  • The hearing began at 3 p.m. ET. It streamed live on all major network and cable news channels, as well as on C-SPAN and on the Committee's website.
  • The next round of hearings is scheduled for July, according to Select Committee Chair Bennie Thompson.

Live Updates Have Ended.

Witnesses Jan 6 Hearing
Former Assistant U.S. Attorney General for the Office of Legal Counsel Steven Engel, former Acting U.S. Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen and former Acting U.S. Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue attend the fifth hearing held by the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 23, 2022 in the Cannon House Office Building in Washington, DC. Jonathan Ernst-Pool/Getty Images

What to Expect From July Hearings

The House Jan. 6 Committee is expected to take a short break from holding public hearings, but will pick them back up in July.

Committee Chairman Bennie Thompson said earlier this week the public hearings, which started on June 9, will resume next month. Once they do, "We're going to show how Donald Trump tapped into the threat of violence, how he summoned the mob to Washington, and how, after corruption and political pressure failed to keep Donald Trump in office, violence became the last option," he said.

Rep. Liz Cheney said Thursday the public heard from more than a dozen Republican witnesses during the committee's June hearings. Some of those witnesses served in Trump's administration or worked with his campaign, and others "have been conservative Republicans for their entire careers," she said.

"You will hear from more in the hearings to come," Cheney added.

Thompson noted the select committee's investigation is "ongoing." The committee's five public hearings thus far "have spurred an influx of new information" that Thompson said committee investigators "are working to assess."

"We are committed to presenting the American people with the most complete information possible. That will be our aim when we reconvene in the coming weeks," Thompson said Thursday as the committee wrapped its fifth day of hearings.

What to expect from July hearings
Committee Chairman, Bennie Thompson (C) presides over the fifth hearing by the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol in the Cannon House Office Building in Washington, D.C., on June 23, 2022. DOUG MILLS/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

'Trump Abused Your Trust,' Cheney Says

Former President Donald Trump abused the trust of his supporters, Representative Liz Cheney said Thursday.

The Wyoming Republican acknowledged the difficulty she said some of Trump's supporters will have in recognizing this abuse of trust while delivering her closing statement during Thursday's House Jan. 6 Committee hearing.

Cheney began her closing statement by thanking the three witnesses who appeared to testify at Thursday's public hearing. Their actions leading up to January 6, 2021 "should have an important long-term impact" and will "help keep us on the course set by the framers of our Constitution," Cheney said.

More than a dozen Republican witnesses, including many who worked for Trump's administration, have testified to "what actually happened in the weeks before January 6" during the select committee's five public hearings thus far, Cheney said.

"It can be difficult to accept that President Trump abused your trust, that he deceived you. Many will invent excuses to ignore that fact," Cheney said.

"That is a fact," she added. "I wish it weren't true. But it is."

“Trump abused your trust,” Cheney says
Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY), Vice Chair of the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, delivers remarks during the fifth hearing on the January 6th investigation in the Cannon House Office Building on June 23, 2022 in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images

DOJ Pressured to Be Arm of Re-Election Campaign

The House Jan. 6 Committee's fifth day of public hearings demonstrated how the U.S. Department of Justice was pressured to serve as an "arm" of former President Donald Trump's re-election campaign, according to Committee Chairman Bennie Thompson.

During his closing statement on Thursday evening, Thompson said Trump was told by several officials that he had lost the 2020 presidential election. Trump then lost court cases his campaign launched in an attempt to challenge the election results.

"But for Donald Trump, that wasn't the end of the line—not even close," Thompson said. "The courts refused to keep him in office, but he continued to lie. And he went in search of anyone who would go along with his scheme.

"We've shown today he pressured the Justice Department to act as an arm of his re-election campaign," Thompson continued. "He hoped law enforcement officials would give the appearance of legitimacy to his lies, so he and his allies had some veneer of credibility when they told the country that the election was stolen."

DOJ pressured to be arm of re-election
Committee Chairman Bennie Thompson speaks during the fifth hearing by the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol in the Cannon House Office Building in Washington, D.C., on June 23, 2022. MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

Top DOJ Officials Warned Trump They Would Resign

Representative Adam Kinzinger asked former acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue about discussions regarding the removal of Jeff Rosen as Attorney General and replacing him with Jeff Clark.

During testimony Thursday, Donoghue described the "heated" meeting when the "pros and cons" of this move were discussed with then-President Donald Trump. Donoghue said no one present in that meeting supported the move and told Trump they would resign if this were to happen. Donoghue told Trump that he had "a great deal" to lose, as did the country and DOJ, if this were to happen.

Multiple assistant attorneys general were also among those prepared to resign if Trump appointed Clark to be the new leader of the DOJ, Donoghue told Kinzinger.

Kinzinger shared photos of five assistant attorneys general on a screen during the Thursday afternoon hearing. Donoghue told the committee that he asked all five officials what they would do if Clark were to become the new U.S. attorney general. Donoghue said he had trouble reaching one assistant attorney general but heard that the other four would resign.

"We got most—not all but most—of the agencies on the phone very quickly, explained to them what the situation was," Donoghue said. He recalled that the head of the civil rights division told him, "I don't need to think about it—there's no way I'm staying."

"And then the other AAGs began to chime in, in turn. And all, essentially, said they would leave, they would resign en mass if the president made that change to department leadership," Donoghue said.

Trump Threatened to Replace Rosen, Donoghue

Former President Donald Trump considered replacing senior Justice Department officials because they would not declare there was widespread election fraud.

Former acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue said Trump was growing "agitated" with him and former acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen because they repeatedly told the President that his fraud claims had no merit.

Trump told them, "people tell me I should just get rid of both" [Rosen and Donoghue] and replace them with Jeff Clark, Donoghue recalled during his testimony.

That way, Trump said, "maybe something would finally get done" in the Justice Department. Donoghue told Trump he should have the leadership he wants.

"But understand the United States Justice Department functions on facts, evidence and law. And those are not going to change," Donoghue said he told Trump. "So you can have whatever leadership you want but the Department's position is not going to change."

He added that then-White House counsel Pat Cipollone was supportive of the DOJ during these discussions.

DOJ Found 'Nothing Improper' with Voting Machines

Former President Donald Trump wanted the Justice Department to seize voting machines from state governments because he believed there were evidence of fraud.

During testimony Thursday, former acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen said the DOJ saw "nothing improper" with the machines.

He said the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), who were experts on such machines, also found nothing wrong. Therefore, it was not appropriate to do so.

Representative Adam Kinzinger said there was no "factual basis" to seize the machines."

Rosen responded that he did not think there was "legal authority" to do so either.

Trump also pressed senior DHS officials to seize the voting machines.

Voting Machines
A video featuring a picture from a White House meeting is played during the fifth hearing by the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol in the Cannon House Office Building on June 23, 2022 in Washington, DC. Alex Wong/Getty Images

Clark Letter Could Have Led to 'Constitutional Crisis'

Part of the focus of Thursday hearing's is on a letter committee members say shows how attorney Jeffrey Clark was involved in the effort to get the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) to help overturn the 2020 election.

Former acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen and former acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue both refused to sign a letter drafted by Clark that was to be sent to state officials in Georgia.

Donoghue told the committee he "had a hard time getting my head" around the letter's contents when he first read it. He added that he "thought it was very important to give a prompt response rejecting this out of hand."

In his response to Clark's proposed letter, he said that he wrote, "this is not the department's role, to suggest or dictate to state legislatures how they should select their electors."

"More importantly, this was not based on the facts, " he said. "This was actually contrary to the facts as developed by department investigations over the last several weeks and months."

"For the department to insert itself into the political process this way, I think would have had grave consequences for the country, and may very well have spiraled us into a constitutional crisis," Donoghue said. "I wanted to make sure that he understood the gravity of the situation, because he didn't seem to really appreciate it."

Richard Donoghue testifies
Richard Donoghue, former acting Deputy Attorney General, testifies before the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol in the Cannon House Office Building on June 23, 2022 in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images

Trump Pressed DOJ to Say Election was Illegal, Corrupt

Former acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue recalled taking notes during a phone call with former acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen and former President Donald Trump.

He said he started taking notes because Trump made a fraud allegation he had not heard before. The claim was about more than 200,000 votes certified in Pennsylvania that were not cast. Donoghue said he wanted to get the allegation down in case the Justice Department looked into it.

Per Donoghue's notes, Trump was upset with DOJ's lack of action. Donoghue said the Department has a specific and limited role when it comes to federal elections.

Donoghue
Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue testifies during the fifth hearing by the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol in the Cannon House Office Building in Washington, DC, on June 23, 2022. MANDEL NGAN//AFP via Getty Images

Donoghue also explained to Trump that the American people are not the clients of the DOJ. The Department's sole client is the U.S. government, he said, and the government had "no standing" on election fraud allegations.

This was explained to Trump on numerous occasions, Donoghue said.

At one point during the conversation, the notes indicate that Trump asked Rosen to "just say the election was corrupt and leave the rest to me and [Republican] Congressmen."

Donoghue told the Committee those were Trump's exact words.

Trump kept pressing the DOJ, saying they "have an obligation to tell people this was an illegal, corrupt election."

Donoghue denied these claims.

While there were some "isolated incidents" of voter fraud, Donoghue said none of those cases were big enough to change the outcome in any state.

Notes on Trump
Handwritten notes from former acting deputy attorney general Richard Donoghue are shown on a screen during the fifth hearing held by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 23, 2022 in the Cannon House Office Building in Washington, DC. Demetrius Freeman-Pool/Getty Images

Trump 'Dissatisfied' with DOJ Lack of Action

Former acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen said he met with Donald Trump virtually every day between December 3, 2020 and January 3, 2021.

He said Trump was "dissatisfied" with the Justice Department that they were not doing enough to investigation claims of election fraud.

Trump also wanted the DOJ to create a special counsel on election fraud, meet with Rudy Giuliani, file a lawsuit with the Supreme Court and make public statements about fraud claims.

Rosen said the DOJ declined all of those requests because he did not think they were appropriate based on facts and laws.

Jeff Rosen
Jeffrey Rosen, former Acting Attorney General, testifies before the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol in the Cannon House Office Building on June 23, 2022 in Washington, DC. Alex Wong//Getty Images

Former acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue said he and other DOJ officials told Trump several times that his claims of election fraud had no merit.

This included a report claiming the Dominion voting machine in Michigan had a high level of error. Trump believed this report proved the election was defective and that he actually won, Donoghue said.

During a meeting on Dec. 27, Donoghue said Trump was becoming more adamant that the DOJ was not doing its job and had an "arsenal of allegations."

Donoghue said he was "trying to cut through the noise," saying Trump had many people whispering in his ear, feeding him these allegations.

Donoghue wanted to be clear with Trump that these allegations were not true and went "piece by piece" to correct those claims.

When asked by Representative Adam Kinzinger if any of those allegation were "credible," Donoghue said "no."

Trump 'Didn't Take No for An Answer,' Kinzinger Says

Former President Donald Trump "didn't take no for an answer" in his pursuit to convince top U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) officials to help him overturn the 2020 election, Rep. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois said Thursday.

Kinzinger, one of two Republicans on the House Jan. 6 Committee, delivered an opening statement at the start of the select committee's Thursday afternoon public hearing before shifting his attention to questioning the day's three witnesses.

Kizinger began his statement by saying pressure applied by a President "can be really hard to resist."

The three officials testifying on Thursday "stood firm against President Trump's political pressure campaign," Kinzinger said.

"They were willing to sacrifice their careers for the good of country," he added.

While the U.S. President is charged with overseeing the DOJ, they cannot allow their personal or political interests to impact how the department operates, Kinzinger said.

After earlier attempts to challenge the results of the election failed, "Trump ultimately wanted the Department of Justice to say the election was 'corrupt,' and, 'leave the rest to me and the Republican congressman'," Kinzinger said, citing quotes previously unveiled by the select committee.

"As you will hear today, the department's top leadership refused," Kinzinger said. "Not surprisingly, President Trump didn't take no for an answer."

Adam Kinzingere opening statement
Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) delivers remarks during the fifth hearing by the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol in the Cannon House Office Building on June 23, 2022 in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images

Sean Penn in Hearing Room to 'Observe'

Actor Sean Penn is present in the room for the House Select Committee investigating the events of Jan. 6.

He is seated next to former D.C. Metro Police officer Michael Fanone, who was injured during the U.S. Capitol riot, and other D.C. and Capitol police officers.

"I'm just here to observe — just another citizen," Penn told reporters. "I think we all saw what happened on January 6 and now we're looking to see if justice comes on the other side of it."

Sean Penn Hearing Room
US actor Sean Penn (C) sits next to Officer Michael Fanone (2nd R) of the Washington, DC, Metropolitan Police Department, as they attend the fifth hearing by the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol in the Cannon House Office Building in Washington, DC, on June 23, 2022. BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images

WATCH: Fifth Hearing to Begin Soon

The fifth Jan. 6 hearing is set to begin soon.

The House Select Committee will focus on former President Donald Trump's efforts to pressure Department of Justice to overturn the 2020 Presidential election.

The hearing will begin at 3 p.m. ET and will stream live on network and cable news networks as well as CSPAN and the Committee website.

Sen. Mo Brooks Willing to Testify if it is 'Public'

Republican Senator Mo Brooks of Alabama said he is willing to testify before the House Select Committee on Jan. 6 if it is done publicly.

"My basic requirement is it be in public so the public can see it so they don't get bits and pieces dribbled out," he told CNN. He added that he wants to see any and all documents the Committee has first.

Brooks participated in the "Stop the Steal" rally on Jan. 6, 2021, moments before the Capitol riot.

The Committee re-issued its subpoena for Brooks after process servers failed to track him down for over a month, Committee Chairman Bennie Thompson told reporters.

The initial subpoena expired after Brooks was unable to be served. This lead the Committee to issue a new one. Thompson said he was the only member the Committee hadn't been able to serve.

"We are in the process of either redoing it or it's out the door already," Thompson said.

Brooks was among the five Republican lawmakers the Committee wanted to hear from about their interactions with Donald Trump before and after the Jan. 6 Capitol riot.

Other Republicans, including House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, declined to appear before the Committee.

Brooks recently lost a runoff election in Alabama after Trump withdrew his endorsement. Once a key Trump ally, Brooks recently said the former President had "no loyalty."

"It's quite clear that Donald Trump has no loyalty to anyone or anything but himself," Brooks told AL.com columnist Kyle Whitmire. "He looked at who he thought had the best chance of winning and that's who he endorsed."

Mo Brooks Jan. 6 Hearing
U.S. Rep. Mo Brooks talks with the media after voting in Alabama's state primary in Huntsville, Ala., Tuesday, May 24, 2022. Brooks is seeking the Republican nomination for US Senator of Alabama Vasha Hunt/AP Photo

Federal Agents Raid Home of Jeffrey Clark

Federal law enforcement agents reportedly searched the Virginia home of former Justice Department official Jeffrey Clark ahead of today's Jan. 6 hearing.

A spokesperson for the U.S. Attorney's office in Washington D.C. confirmed to reporters that "there was law enforcement activity in that area" around Clark's home Wednesday, but did not comment on a specific person or activity.

Clark, a former assistant Attorney General for the Environment and Natural Resources Division, is expected to be at the center of today's hearing. The House Select Committee is expected to show how former President Donald Trump planned to replace then acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen with Clark, who pushed Trump's election fraud claims.

Gas Up $1.86 Since Committee Launch: McCarthy

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said on Thursday he does "not regret" deciding against appointing Republicans to the House Jan. 6 Committee, which is set to begin its fifth day of public hearings on Thursday afternoon.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced the select committee last year. McCarthy rescinded his Republican appointments to serve on the committee after Pelosi blocked his first two picks. Two Republicans—Reps. Liz Cheney of Wyoming and Adam Kinzinger of Illinois—are serving on the committee, but both have been frequently criticized by former President Donald Trump after voting to impeach him last year.

"I do not regret not appointing anybody at all," McCarthy said during a press conference Thursday morning. "How can you have an honest investigation if the speaker can appoint and pick and choose who can be on?"

McCarthy continued by saying the committee is "political" before shifting his comments to gas prices, which have set new records across the country over the last few months.

"Gas has gone up a dollar and 86 cents a gallon since the day Nancy Pelosi announced that committee," McCarthy said.

WATCH: Trailer Drops for Trump Docuseries

A trailer for the upcoming documentary series focusing on former President Donald Trump's final weeks in office was released on June 22 by the Warner Bros. Discovery streaming service Discovery+.

A spokesperson for the streaming service told The Hollywood Reporter earlier this week that the three-part documentary series, titled Unprecedented, will be released this summer.

Footage British filmmaker Alex Holder captured for the project has been of interest to the House Jan. 6 Committee. Holder was called to testify publicly before the committee earlier this month.

Holder released a statement on June 21 that said the House Select Committee had subpoenaed his footage. Holder said the footage he captured featured coverage of the last six weeks of Trump's re-election campaign, interviews with Trump and members of his family, and the attack at the U.S. Capitol Building on January 6, 2021.

The trailer released this week is 30 seconds long and includes brief clips from Holder's interviews with Trump and two of his children. It also includes scenes from the January 6 riot and from rallies in support of Trump as the phrases "unprecedented access" and "unprecedented times" flash across the screen.

In the trailer, Ivanka Trump describes her father as "very honest" and as a person who "is who he is." Donald Trump Jr. said his father "believes everything that he's doing is right."

"I think I treat people well, unless they don't treat me well, in which case you go to war," Trump says in one interview clip.

The trailer ends with Holder asking Trump, "Can we talk for a minute about January 6?"

"Yep," Trump says in response before the trailer cuts away.

Key Moments From Day 4

The fifth Jan. 6 hearing comes just two days after the last hearing.

Here are the key moments from witnesses and Committee members from Tuesday, June 21:

Wandrea ArShaye "Shaye" Moss

Former Georgia election worker Wandrea ArShaye "Shaye" Moss shared how her life was "turned upside down" after Donald Trump's lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, release a video claiming she and her mother, Ruby Freeman, were involved in a voter fraud scheme.

Giuliani said Moss and Freeman were involved in a plot to kick out observers, bring suitcases of false ballots for Biden into the arena and then run them through the machines multiple times. None of these accusations were true.

Moss recalled the threats she faced after that video was released, including racist and hateful messages on Facebook.

"It turned my life upside down," Moss said during her testimony. "I no longer give out my business card. I don't transfer calls. I don't want anyone knowing my name. I don't want to go anywhere with my mom, because she might yell my name out over the grocery aisle, or something. I don't go to the grocery store at all. I haven't been anywhere at all."

Brad Raffensperger

Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger debunked Trump's claims of voter fraud during his testimony.

Raffensperger said that Trump was probably suspicious of the vote in Georgia because 28,000 people skipped the Presidential election but voted down the ballot for state and local officials.

Raffensperger also debunked several other claims Trump made about fraud in the Georgia election. He said Trump's allegation that "close to 5,000" dead people voted was "not accurate."

He also said the state ran nearly 300 investigations that checked every allegation Trump and his team made to ensure the count was accurate.

"The numbers are the numbers," he said. "The numbers don't lie."

Raffensperger also discussed the call from Trump, in which the former President asked him to "find" 11,780 votes in his favor. Raffensperger said "there were no votes to be found."

Brad Sterling

Georgia Secretary of State Chief Operating Officer Gabriel Sterling debunked Trump and Giuliani's claims that election workers in Fulton County, Georgia brought a suitcase of Biden ballots into the counting room.

Sterling said the footage from the counting room showed country workers engaging in "normal ballot processing."

He said those trunks that were pulled from under the tables were the standard ballot containers.

Rusty Bowers

Ahead of the last hearing, Trump released a statement criticizing the Arizona House Speaker Rusty Bower and referred to him as a RINO, or Republican in name only.

Trump claimed Bowers told him the election was rigged and won the state of Arizona. Bowers denied these claims during his testimony.

Bowers said Trump and Giuliani asked him to replace state electors for Joe Biden with ones for Trump.

He refused to give into the pressure campaign because it was "counter" to his oath to uphold the Constitution.

"You're asking me to do something against my oath, and I will not break my oath," Bowers said.

Giuliani could not provide evidence for these election fraud claims, Bowers said, adding that Giuliani told him "we've got lots of theories, we just don't have the evidence."

Bowers also refused a request from Arizona Representative Andy Biggs to decertify state electors the morning of Jan. 6, 2021.

QAnon Shaman

The Committee showed new video footage of the man known as the QAnon Shaman.

Representative Adam Schiff said Jacob Chansley, who is also known as the QAnon Shaman, was not only at the U.S. Capitol in Jan. 6, but he was also part of earlier protests at state capitols.

"The select committee has uncovered evidence in the course of our investigation that at Stop the Steal protests at state capitols across the country, there were individuals with ties to the groups or parties involved in the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol," Schiff said.

A video showed Chansley at the Arizona House of Representatives building. Protesters can be seen "illegally entering and refusing to leave" the government building, Schiff said.

Liz Cheney

Republican Representative Liz Cheney, the Committee Vice Chair, revealed that more than 30 witnesses who were called to testify have invoked their Fifth Amendment rights against self-incrimination.

This includes Trump adviser Rodger Stone, General Michael Flynn and Trump's lawyer John Eastman. She said Steve Bannon and Trump's campaign adviser Peter Navarro refused to comply with Congressional subpoenas.

Former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows is "hiding behind Trump's claim of executive privilege," she added.

Cheney called on former White House counsel Pat Cipollone to testify before the Committee.

"Our committee is certain that Donald Trump does not want Pat Cipollone to testify," she said. "The American people deserve to hear from Mr. Cipollone personally. He should appear before this committee, and we are working to secure his testimony."

Trump Criticizes 'Abysmal' Hearings Ratings

Former President Donald Trump posted a statement on Truth Social criticizing the House Jan. 6 Committee hearings hours before the fifth day of public hearings was expected to begin.

Trump said television ratings for the hearings have been "absolutely abysmal" in his Thursday morning post.

"Their lead investigator just quit, they cancelled or postponed future hearings, the T.V. Ratings are absolutely abysmal, and Shifty Schiff continues his sanctimonious 'interviews' just as though he were talking about his first four failed hoaxes," his post said.

The first part of the former President's statement was referring to a CNN report that John Wood, one of the committee's investigators, will not continue with the committee after this week. Trump's statement also revived his past criticisms of Rep. Adam Schiff, a California Democrat Trump often refers to as "Shifty Schiff."

Trump has posted often on Truth Social about the hearings since they started earlier this month. After the committee's fourth day of public hearings concluded earlier this week, Trump posted a statement that said the hearing featured "tremendous lies and innuendo."

"They don't want the facts of the Election, or discussions of the Security Breach by Pelosi and the Dems, they only want to continue the Greatest Witch Hunt in our Country's history," Trump's June 22 post said of the select committee.

"You will never get the truth when you have biased and hateful witnesses who are allowed to go on and on without even the slightest cross examination. Republicans should be allowed representation!!!"

Trump
Former President Donald Trump speaks at the Road to Majority conference Friday, June 17, 2022, in Nashville, Tenn. Mark Humphrey/AP Photo

Committee to Speak With Ginni Thomas

The House Select Committee investigating the events leading up to Jan. 6 is working to set up and interview with Virginia "Ginni" Thomas, the wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas.

Ginni Thomas has responded to the panel's request to appear, Committee Chairman Representative Bennie Thompson told reporters Wednesday.

She was asked to speak after communications between her and Donald Trump's team in the days leading up to the Jan. 6 Capitol riot were disclosed.

"It's our expectation that we will keep talking and trying to get her to come in," Thompson told reporters.

Thomas, a conservative activist, sent emails to Republican state Representative Rusty Bowers of Arizona urging him and other state officials to discredit electors for Joe Biden and support Donald Trump.

Thomas also attended a rally Trump held before the riot and wrote to then-White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows after the 2020 Presidential election pressing him to overturn the results for Biden.

The Committee also obtained emails between Thomas and Trump's lawyer John Eastman.

Ginni Thomas
The House Committee investigating Jan. 6 will hear from Ginni Thomas, Above, (L-R) Associate Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas sits with his wife and conservative activist Virginia Thomas while he waits to speak at the Heritage Foundation on October 21, 2021 in Washington, DC. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Rosen to Reject Claims of 'Stolen' Election

Jeffrey Rosen, who served as acting U.S. Attorney General between December 2020 and January 2021, is one of three witnesses scheduled to testify before the House Jan. 6 Committee's public hearing on Thursday.

CBS News obtained prepared testimony that Rosen is expected to deliver when the hearing convenes Thursday afternoon. Rosen will tell the House Select Committee that the U.S. Department of Justice "maintained the position that the department had been presented with no evidence of widespread fraud at a scale sufficient to change the outcome of the 2020 election."

"Some argued to the former president and public that the election was corrupt and stolen," the prepared testimony said. "That view was wrong then and it is wrong today, and I hope our presence here today helps reaffirm that fact."

Rosen served as Deputy Attorney General before he succeeded former Attorney General William Barr, who resigned from office in late 2020.

Former President Donald Trump reportedly instructed Rosen at the time to "just say the election was corrupt," according to handwritten notes from a December 2020 phone call that the committee released last summer.

Rosen to reject claims of “stolen” election
Video featuring former acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen is played during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol in the Cannon House Office Building on June 13, 2022 in Washington, D.C. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Former DOJ Officials to Testify

Three former Department of Justice officials will testify before the House Select Committee Thursday.

The officials will discuss former President Donald Trump's attempt to pressure the DOJ to support his election fraud claims.

Jeffrey Rosen

The former acting Attorney General took over the Justice Department after Bill Barr resigned.

Trump tried to pressure Rosen into supporting his claims to overturn the 2020 Presidential election.

Trump wanted to replace Rosen with Jeffrey Clark, an environmental lawyer who supported his election fraud claims.

Rosen said Clark had mentioned "internet theories" about voting machine being hacked.

Richard Donoghue

The former acting Deputy Attorney General told the House Select Committee last year that he mentioned Jeff Clark "is not even competent to serve as Attorney General."

"He's never been a criminal attorney," Donoghue said. "He's never conducted a criminal investigation in his life. He's never been in front of a grand jury, much less a trial jury.

"You're an environmental lawyer. How about you go back to your office, and we'll call you when there's an oil spill."

Donoghue was the official who took notes on the call between Trump and Rosen, in which the former President asked Rosen to say the election was corrupt.

Steven Engel

The former assistant Attorney General for the Office of Legal Counsel ran the branch of the DOJ that provided legal advice to the President and the Executive Branch during Trump's term in office.

During his deposition for the House Committee, Engle said he told Trump that he and other senior DOJ officials Rose would resign if he fired Rosen and replaced him with Clark.

Jeffrey Rosen
Former U.S. Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey A. Rosen will testify before the Jan. 6 hearing Thursday. Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images

Day 5 to Focus on Trump's Attempt to Pressure the DOJ

Today's hearing will focus on former President Donald Trump's effort to pressure the Department of Justice to support his attempt to overturn the 2020 Presidential election.

Three DOJ officials will testify before the House Select Committee on how Trump wanted them to bolster his claims of election fraud.

The hearing will also discuss a meeting between Trump, DOJ officials and lawyers from the White House counsel's office on Jan. 3, 2021. Trump planned to replace former acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen with Jeffrey Clark, an assistant U.S. Attorney General who wanted to champion Trump's claims of election fraud.

In a phone conversation, Trump directed Rosen to "just say the election was corrupt and leave the rest to men and the R. Congressmen," according to handwritten notes taken by former acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue.

Committee aides said the hearing will focus on the role Clark played within the DOJ to push Trump's election fraud claims. Clark was subpoenaed by the Committee but invoked his Fifth Amendment rights and refused to answer questions during a deposition.

Republican Representative Adam Kinzinger of Illinois will lead today's hearing. He will be asking the bulk of the questions to witnesses and will provide opening and closing statements.

Trump DOJ
The fifth hearing will focus on Donald Trump's attempt to pressure the Department of Justice to support his voter fraud claims. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images