Mike Lindell Promises 'Cyber Symposium' on Election Fraud Will 'Change History,' Reinstate Trump

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell insisted that his planned "cyber symposium" scheduled for August will "change history" and reveal evidence of election fraud leading to former President Donald Trump's loss in November 2020.

The prominent conspiracy theorist and Trump loyalist has repeatedly claimed to have evidence that Trump actually won the 2020 election. These baseless claims, which have been promoted by the former president and many of his supporters, have been thoroughly litigated and wholly debunked. But Lindell continues to travel around the country and participate in rallies where thousands of attendees appear to believe the groundless allegations.

During a Saturday episode of War Room, a podcast hosted by former Trump administration official Steve Bannon, Lindell said that he has "manifested" into an American patriot. "Everyone's been coming up to me and going, 'You're our hope,' and all these things," the businessman said. "And I'm saying, 'You know, God blessed me with a big platform for such a time as this,' and that's the way I look at it."

Lindell said that he would be announcing more details about a "cyber symposium" to reveal election fraud this weekend on Independence Day, which he described as "so symbolic." He previously said that the event would be held on August 10, 11 and 12.

Mike Lindell
Mike Lindell promised on Saturday that his August "cyber symposium" will "change history." In this photo, the MyPillow CEO talks in the press box during during a campaign-style rally for former President Donald Trump in Wellington, Ohio on June 26. STEPHEN ZENNER/AFP via Getty Images

"This is going to change the world. It's gonna change it, you know, it's gonna show everything and that this election was taken," Lindell claimed. "And where we're at, we're in this battle with communism and the CCP [Chinese Communist Party] and big government and everything." The businessman claims that the election was rigged by China.

"We're gonna show it all! We're gonna show it all!" the Trump loyalist said with enthusiasm, claiming his symposium would "save this country." The MyPillow CEO complained that legal experts and the media are "already attacking" his planned symposium and alleged evidence.

"These three days in August are gonna change history. We're gonna say, 'Here it is,' and now everybody look at it and you see and you tell me—you can't change these packet captures, they're forever captured in time," Lindell said. The businessman went on to say that he would show "at least three ways" Trump will "absolutely be put back in" as president.

Computer scientists have readily fact-checked Lindell's claims about packet captures, pointing out the incoherence of his arguments and explanations. The Washington Post also reported that the data of the packet captures Lindell has used in his multiple inaccurate documentaries about the 2020 election appear to just be voter information from Pennsylvania, which can be purchased from the state by anyone.

Furthermore, dozens of election challenge lawsuits filed by Trump and his allies were already dismissed in state and federal courts. Even judges appointed by the former president and other Republicans have rejected the groundless allegations of fraud. Meanwhile, multiple audits and recounts—including in states where the election was overseen by pro-Trump Republicans—have reaffirmed Biden's victory over Trump.

Former Attorney General William Barr, who was widely viewed as one of Trump's most loyal Cabinet officials, said in December that there was "no evidence" to substantiate claims of widespread election fraud. The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency at the Department of Homeland Security said after the election that there was "no evidence that any voting system deleted or lost votes, changed votes, or was in any way compromised." That federal agency was led by a Trump appointee at the time.

Despite these facts, Trump's and Lindell's lies about the 2020 election appear to have resonated with the majority of Republican voters. Polling conducted by Quinnipiac University in May found that two-thirds (66 percent) of GOP voters did not believe Biden's win was valid. Just 25 percent of Republicans saw Biden as the legitimate president.

Lindell has said that he believes Trump will be "reinstated" as president later this year—something that legal experts have pointed out is not possible. Trump, according to The New York Times, has told associates that he also believes he will return to the White House soon.

Newsweek reached out to Trump's press office for comment but did not immediately receive a response.