Texas School Shooter Ramos 'Loved Hurting Animals': Uvalde Classmate

Teenage gunman Salvador Ramos was known for abusing animals prior to Tuesday's massacre of 19 schoolchildren and two teachers in Uvalde, Texas, according to some of his fellow students.

One Ulvade High School classmate said Ramos, 18, was a bully who hurt dogs and provoked other people, despite claims by family and friends that the shooter was a victim teased for a stutter and other reasons.

"He would go to the park and try to pick on people and he loved hurting animals," Jaime Arellano told the Daily Beast.

He recalled witnessing Ramos once brutally attacking a dog.

"He would try and call people names and start fights," Arellano told the outlet. "I remember there was one time we saw him beating a little dog senseless."

Uvalde Texas Robb Elementary Memorial
Teenage gunman Salvador Ramos, who killed 19 schoolchildren and two teachers at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on Tuesday, was known for abusing animals prior to the massacre, according to some of his fellow classmates. Above, a woman cries at a makeshift memorial at the school on May 29. CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP VIA GETTY IMAGES

Another classmate, Ivan Arellano, echoed those statements during an interview with a local news station earlier in the week.

"He, prior, and I don't see this covered and I'm gonna put this out there, he would hurt animals," Ivan Arellano told WFAA. "He was not a good person."

Arellano claimed Ramos would become upset when his attempts to aggravate individuals didn't work.

"Salvador Ramos was a boy who was not bullied," he told WFAA. "He would try to pick on people and fail and it would aggravate him."

In a different interview, he said there were warning signs.

"A lot of people who knew him, we knew he wasn't mentally healthy," he told the BBC. "And a lot of people could agree that we probably should've said something."

The parent of another Uvalde student said she believes Ramos' behavior was beyond the help of local therapists.

"Sure, we have some therapists here locally but they aren't really qualified to handle something like this guy," Ariel Silva told the Daily Beast. "This school never has enough money to really do all of the things they need to do. This is not a wealthy community."

She believes a lack of resources and school funding, which is provided by revenue from taxes and state subsidies, could have been part of the reason Ramos slipped through the cracks.

"I am sure they do what they can," she told the Daily Beast. "But we just don't get the funding that other schools seem to get."

Area resident Lydia Martinez said Republican lawmakers pay more attention to larger cities.

"If we had resources and representation we might could have avoided this," Martinez told the Daily Beast.

Ramos' mother, in an interview with ABC News, said at times her son was "aggressive" and gave her an "uneasy feeling," but that he was "not a monster."