Jan 6. Hearing Updates: Hearings to Resume in July

Live Updates
  • The House Select Committee investigating the events of January 6 held its sixth hearing Tuesday.
  • Cassidy Hutchinson, the aide to former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, testified.
  • Hutchinson previously told the Committee that several Republican lawmakers sought pardons for spreading claims of election fraud following the riot at the U.S. Capitol.
  • The Committee played video clips of Hutchinson's previously recorded deposition during previous hearings. She said Meadows burned several documents after a meeting with Republican Representative Scott Perry.
  • Hearings were not expected to resume until July, but the Committee made a last-minute announcement of this hearing Monday afternoon.
Cassidy Hutchinson Testifying
Cassidy Hutchinson, former aide to Trump White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, is sworn in to testify as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol holds a hearing at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, June 28, 2022. Andrew Harnik, Pool/AP Photo

Live Updates Have Ended.

Hearings to Resume in July

During his closing statement, House Select Committee Chair Bennie Thompson encouraged other witnesses to come forward to cooperate with the investigation into the events surrounding Jan. 6.

"I want to speak directly to the handful of witnesses who have been outliers in our investigation, the small number who have defied us outright, those whose memories have failed them again and again on the most important details and to those who fear Donald Trump and his enablers," he said.

"Because of this courageous woman and others like her, your attempt to hide the truth from the American people will fail," Thompson added.

He said the committee's "door is open" for any witnesses who heard the testimony from Cassidy Hutchinson and "suddenly remembered things you couldn't recall," want to clarify details or "discovered some courage."

Thompson told reporters after the hearing that the Committee will "seriously consider" inviting former White House Counsel Pat Cipollone "for a transcribed interview or something like that."

The Committee will reconvene in July to present more evidence and witness testimony in the coming weeks.

Bennie Thompson Liz Cheney
Chairman Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., and Vice Chair Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., listen as Cassidy Hutchinson, former aide to Trump White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, testifies as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol holds a hearing at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, June 28, 2022 J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo

Trump Driver May Dispute Altercation Report

The head of former President Donald Trump's security detail and the former president's driver may dispute a reported physical altercation involving Trump that reportedly occurred on January 6, 2021.

Cassidy Hutchinson, who worked as an aide to former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, testified on Tuesday that she was told about the altercation by Tony Ornato, the assistant director of the U.S. Secret Service Office of Training.

Hutchinson said Trump was "irate" when he was told the presidential vehicle known as "The Beast" would be taking him to the White House instead of the U.S. Capitol Building. Trump had wanted to go to the Capitol after his speech that morning at the Ellipse, Hutchinson said.

Ornato told Hutchinson Trump had said to Bobby Engel, then the head of the president's security detail, something along the lines of, "I'm the effing president. Take me up to the Capitol now." When Engel refused, Hutchinson said Trump "reached up towards the front of the vehicle to grab at the steering wheel." After one of his arms was grabbed, Trump "used his free hand to lunge towards Bobby Engel," Hutchinson said Ornato had told her.

Trump disputed Hutchinson's account of the altercation in a Tuesday post on Truth Social.

After the hearing concluded, Peter Alexander, the chief White House correspondent at NBC News, reported that he had been told Engel and Trump's driver on that day were "prepared to testify under oath" and dispute Hutchinson's retelling of the incident.

Witness Tampering a 'Serious Problem' for Trump

Mick Mulvaney, who once served as the acting White House chief of staff under former President Donald Trump, said the House Jan. 6 Committee's apparent belief that it has evidence of witness tampering could be "a serious problem" for Trump if proven true.

Rep. Liz Cheney, the select committee's vice chair, shared two examples of people who had reported witness intimidation before speaking with the committee. She did not identify the witnesses.

"I think most Americans know that attempting to influence witnesses to testify untruthfully presents very serious concerns," Cheney said during her closing statement.

Mulvaney described the suggestion of witness tampering as "the real bomb that got dropped" at the select committee's Tuesday public hearing, where committee members heard testimony from Cassidy Hutchinson. Hutchinson worked as an aide to former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows leading up to and during the Capitol riot on January 6, 2021.

"If there is hard evidence, that is a serious problem for the former President," Mulvaney said of potential witness tampering.

Mulvaney posted several tweets about the committee's Tuesday hearing, which he said presented "explosive stuff." He listed five of the main points the committee explored during the hearing, ending with potential witness tampering.

"That is a very, very bad day for Trump," Mulvaney tweeted.

Trump Threw Dishes More Than Once: Hutchinson

Before Cassidy Hutchinson testified publicly in front of the House Jan. 6 Committee on Tuesday, Rep. Liz Cheney said the former White House aide had provided information on more than one instance in which Trump physically expressed anger related to the 2020 presidential election.

Hutchinson, who worked as an aide to former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, told the select committee on Tuesday about a physical altercation she had been told Trump was involved in with the head of his security detail while inside a presidential vehicle on January 6, 2021.

That altercation "was not the first time that the president had become very angry about issues relating to the election," Cheney noted.

The Republican congresswoman then mentioned an interview former Attorney General Bill Barr did with The Associated Press on December 1, in which Barr said the U.S. Department of Justice had not found evidence of widespread fraud in the 2020 election. Cheney asked Hutchinson to share how the president reacted to Barr's interview.

Hutchinson said she remembered hearing noise down the hall from where she was working in the White House that day. A valet arrived and told Meadows Trump wanted to speak with him in the dining room. After Meadows left to see Trump and returned, Hutchinson said she too went to the dining room and found the doors open.

"The valet was inside the dining room, changing the tablecloth off the dining room table," she said.

"He motioned for me to come in," she said of the valet, "and then pointed towards the front of the room near the fireplace mantle and the TV, where I first noticed there was ketchup dripping down the wall, and there was a shattered porcelain plate on the floor."

Hutchinson said the valet "had articulated that the president was extremely angry at the attorney general's AP interview, and had thrown his lunch against the wall."

As Hutchinson helped the valet clean up, she said he encouraged her to "stay clear" of Trump because he was "really ticked off" about the interview.

Cheney asked Hutchinson if this incident was the only time she knew of where Trump had thrown dishes.

"It's not," Hutchinson said, adding that she had told Meadows of other times when Trump had thrown dishes or flipped the tablecloth in the dining room.

Trump disputed this element of Hutchinson's testimony in a Truth Social post. The post began by disputing her recount of the physical altercation in the presidential vehicle before Trump shifted his focus to the broken dishes.

"Her story of me throwing food is also false...and why would SHE have to clean it up, I hardly knew who she was," the post said.

'I Never Said' Pence Deserved Threats, Trump Says

Former President Donald Trump disputed Cassidy Hutchinson's testimony that Trump believed former Vice President Mike Pence was deserving of rioters' threats of violence on January 6, 2021.

In clips of video testimony the House Jan. 6 Committee played on Tuesday, Hutchinson, who worked as a top aide for former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, recalled a conversation on the day of the riot between Meadows and former White House counsel Pat Cipollone.

Hutchinson said Cipollone told Meadows some of the Capitol rioters were calling for Pence to be hung.

"Mark had responded something to the effect of, 'You heard him, Pat. He thinks Mike deserves it. He doesn't think they're doing anything wrong,'" Hutchinson told the select committee.

Trump rejected that section of Hutchinson's pre-recorded testimony in a post on Truth Social.

"I NEVER SAID, "MIKE PENCE DESERVES IT (to be hung)," Trump's post said. "Another made up statement by a third rate social climber!"

Trump Says Limo Altercation Is 'Fake Story'

Former President Donald Trump disputed several elements of Cassidy Hutchinson's testimony before the House Jan. 6 Committee on Tuesday.

Trump posted more than 10 reactions to Hutchinson's testimony on his Truth Social account in the first three hours after the select committee began streaming Hutchinson's appearance live Tuesday afternoon.

One of the elements of Hutchinson's testimony that Trump disputed was about a physical altercation she said occurred within the Presidential limo on January 6, 2021.

Hutchinson said she had heard from Tony Ornato, the assistant director of the U.S. Secret Service Office of Training, that Trump believed he would be going to the U.S. Capitol Building after his speech that day at the Ellipse. When the head of his security detail informed Trump they would instead be going to the White House, Hutchinson said Trump had tried to grab the steering wheel before using "his free hand to lunge" at the security official.

Trump described the account as "fake" in one of his posts on Truth Social.

"Her fake story that I tried to grab the steering wheel of the White House Limousine in order to steer it to the Capitol Building is 'sick' and fraudulent, very much like the Unselect Committee itself," Trump's post said.

"Wouldn't even have been possible to do such a ridiculous thing," he added.

Some Witnesses Report Intimidation

Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming suggested during her closing statement before the Jan. 6 House Committee's Tuesday public hearing that witness tampering may be occurring as the select committee continues its investigation.

Cheney, a Republican, began her closing remarks by thanking the day's witness, Cassidy Hutchinson, for her cooperation. Hutchinson served as a top aide to former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows during the end of former President Donald Trump's administration.

While Cheney said the committee has interacted with many witnesses who testified "fully and forthrightly," she said that "has not been true of every witness."

The select committee often asks witnesses who are linked to the former President's administration or Presidential campaign if they have been contacted by anyone attempting to influence what they tell the committee, Cheney said.

Cheney then shared two examples of these tries at testimony influence. One witness, whom Cheney did not identify, said they were told, "as long as I continue to be a team player, they know that I'm on the team, I'm doing the right thing, I'm protecting who I need to protect, you know, I'm going to stay in good graces in Trump World."

That witness added the person who had spoken with them "reminded me a couple of times that Trump does read transcripts and just to keep that in mind as I proceeded through my depositions and interviews with the committee."

Another witness told the committee they had received a phone call ahead of their testimony, during which the person on the other end of the line said, "[A person] let me know you have your deposition tomorrow. He wants me to let you know that he's thinking about you. He knows you're loyal, and you're going to do the right thing when you go in for your deposition."

"I think most Americans know that attempting to influence witnesses to testify untruthfully presents very serious concerns," Cheney said.

Rep. Liz Cheney closing statement
Committee Chairman Bennie Thompson (left) and Rep. Liz Cheney are photographed during the sixth hearing by the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, in Washington, D.C., on June 28, 2022. MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

Trump Cabinet Discussed 25th Amendment

Top officials in the Trump administration had conversations about invoking the 25th Amendment following the events of Jan. 6, Cassidy Hutchinson testified.

After the Jan. 6 riot on the U.S. Capitol, there were discussions among Trump's Cabinet about "stripping the full power of the Presidency from Donald Trump," Committee Vice Chair Liz Cheney said.

Former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo reached out to former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows to make him aware of conversations he was hearing about the 25th Amendment.

The 25th Amendment gives the Cabinet the power to remove the President from office if his is unable to fulfill his duties.

Hutchinson said Pompeo wanted Meadows to be aware of it and put it on his radar, as Meadow was the "boss of the Cabinet secretaries."

Pompeo told Meadows that, "if conversations progress, you should be ready to take action on this," adding that he was "concerned" for him and his position, Hutchinson said.

Hutchinson added that White House staffers were adamant that Donald Trump needed to give a speech on Jan. 7 because they were worries his Cabinet would invoke the 25th Amendment. She said they believed Trump needed "cover."

Trump did not agree with the draft of the speech. Hutchinson said Trump wanted to include lines about not prosecuting rioters and even pardoning them.

"This is just with the increased emphasis of his mindset at the time which was he didn't think they did anything wrong," she said. "The person who did something wrong that day was Mike Pence."

Fox News host Sean Hannity texted former White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany after the Jan. 6 riot. He said there should be "no more stolen election talk" and that "impeachment and the 25th Amendment are real and many people will quit."

Giuliani, Meadows Had Interest in Pardons

Rudy Giuliani and Mark Meadows both expressed interest in receiving Presidential pardons related to the events that unfolded on January 6, 2021, Cassidy Hutchinson testified Tuesday.

Rep. Liz Cheney, the Vice Chair of the House Jan. 6 Committee, asked Hutchinson about discussions that took place in the White House surrounding a video statement former President Donald Trump released the day after the Capitol riot.

In earlier discussions with the select committee, Hutchinson said Trump had wanted to include language within the statement about potentially granting Presidential pardons to the rioters, according to a video clip of that earlier testimony the committee played on Tuesday.

Hutchinson told the committee again on Tuesday that she had heard Trump was interested in including language about Presidential pardons within his January 7, 2021 video statement and added, "I understand that Mr. Meadows was encouraging that language, as well."

Cheney later asked if Giuliani, an attorney for Trump at that time, had ever indicated interest in getting a Presidential pardon related to January 6.

"He did," Hutchinson said.

Cheney then asked if Meadows had expressed interest in receiving a pardon related to the events on January 6.

"Mr. Meadows did seek that pardon, yes ma'am," Hutchinson said.

Laura Ingraham, Sean Hannity Asked Trump to Call Rioters Off

Several people urged former President Donald Trump to send the rioters home on Jan. 6, Cassidy Hutchinson testified.

There were three camps advising Trump, Hutchinson said. Ivanka Trump was among those urging Trump to take immediate action. Then there was a neutral group that tried to "toe the line" because they knew Trump did not want to take immediate action.

The final group wanted to "deflect and blame," Hutchinson said. They wanted to blame ANTIFA for the rioting. She said White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows was in the deflect and blame category, but ultimately remained more neutral.

Many people texted Mark Meadows, asking him to tell Trump to tell the rioters to go home on Jan. 6, including Fox News hosts Laura Ingraham and Sean Hannity.

Ingraham texted Meadows that the riot is "hurting us all" and would destroy Trump's legacy.

Hannity asked if Trump could make a statement asking people to "peacefully leave the Capitol."

Donald Trump Jr. also texted Meadows asking him to tell his father to condemn the rioters "ASAP."

Sean Hannity
A text from Sean Hannity to Mark Meadows, former White House Chief of Staff, is displayed as Cassidy Hutchinson, a top former aide to Meadows, testifies during the sixth hearing by the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol, in Washington, DC, on June 28, 2022. ANNA MONEYMAKER/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Trump Believed Pence 'Deserved' Threats from Rioters

As rioters approached the Capitol Building around 2 p.m. on Jan. 6, Cassidy Hutchinson said it was like "watching a bad car accident about the happen."

"You cant stop it but you want to do something," she said.

She urged Mark Meadows to "snap out of it" and do something. Former White House Counsel Pat Cipollone told Meadows that Donald Trump needed to take action.

Meadows said Trump "wants to be alone right now" and "he doesn't want anything to do with Pat."

Hutchinson said Cipollone told Meadows that if he did not do anything, people were going to die and "blood is going to be on your hands."

Only then did Meadows take action. Hutchinson then recalls Meadows on the phone with Republican Rep. Jim Jordan of Ohio.

Then Cipollone told Meadows that rioters were chanting to "hang Mike Pence."

Meadows said that Trump believed Pence "deserved it" and that the rioters were not doing anything wrong, Hutchinson testified.

Then, Trump sent a tweet about Pence no having the courage to "do what should be done to protect out Country and our Constitution."

Hutchinson said she felt frustrated and disappointed after reading the tweet, adding that it "felt personal."

"As an American, I was disgusted," she said. "It was unpatriotic. It was un-American. We were watching the Capitol Building get defaced over a lie."

Trump Tweet Mike Pence
A tweet from then president Donald Trump is shown on a screen during the sixth hearing by the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol, in Washington, DC, on June 28, 2022 MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

WH Lawyer Warned Against Trump Capitol Visit

Pat Cipollone, a White House lawyer during former President Donald Trump's administration, warned members of the White House staff about the legal consequences that could follow if Trump went through with his intention to go to the Capitol Building on January 6, 2021.

Cassidy Hutchinson, a top aide for former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, testified during the House Jan. 6 Committee's Tuesday public hearing that the former President had wanted to go to the Capitol following his speech that morning at the Ellipse.

Hutchinson said she spoke with Cipollone that morning before she went to the Ellipse to watch the president's speech.

"Mr. Cipollone said something to the effect of, 'please make sure we don't go up to the Capitol, Cassidy. Keep in touch with me. We're going to get charged with every crime imaginable if we make that visit happen'," she said.

In earlier conversations with the Committee, Hutchinson testified that Cipollone had been concerned before January 6 that a visit to the Capitol on that day from Trump "would look like we were obstructing justice or obstructing the Electoral College count," according to a video clip from her earlier testimony that the select committee played on Tuesday.

Cipollone was "also worried that it would look like we were inciting a riot, or encouraging a riot" at the Capitol, Hutchinson said in her earlier testimony.

Trump Involved in Physical Altercation in Limo

Former President Donald Trump was involved in a physical altercation in the Presidential limo after he learned he would not be taken to the Capitol Building on January 6, Cassidy Hutchinson said Tuesday.

Hutchinson, the former aide to White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, said Trump had wanted to go to the Capitol following his speech at the Ellipse as the joint session of Congress was certifying the results of the 2020 Presidential election.

When Hutchinson returned to the White House after Trump's Ellipse speech, she said Tony Ornato, the assistant director of the U.S. Secret Service Office of Training, waved her into his office. Ornato said Trump had been under the impression that he would be taken to the Capitol when he got inside the Presidential limo, known as "The Beast," after his speech.

Trump was "irate" to learn he was being taken to the White House instead of the Capitol, Hutchinson said.

Speaking to Bobby Engel, then the head of Trump's security detail, Trump "said something to the effect of, 'I'm the effing president. Take me up to the Capitol now,'" Hutchinson said Ornato had told her.

When Engel refused, "the President reached up towards the front of the vehicle to grab at the steering wheel," Hutchinson said. "Mr. Engel grabbed his arm and said, 'sir, you need to take your hand off the steering wheel. We're going back to the West Wing. We're not going to the Capitol."

Trump then "used his free hand to lunge towards Bobby Engel," Hutchinson continued. She recalled that, as Ornato told her the story, "he had motioned towards his clavicle."

Trump Says Hutchinson is 'Bad News'

Former President Donald Trump called Cassidy Hutchinson a "total phony and leaker" in a statement, as she testified before the House Select Committee Tuesday.

"I hardly know who this person, Cassidy Hutchinson, is, other than I heard very negative things about her (a total phony and "leaker")," Trump said on his Truth Social account.

He said Hutchinson requested to go with others on Trump's team to Florida aftert his term as President. Trump said he "personally turned her request down."

"Why did she want to go with us if she felt we were so terrible? I understand that she was very upset and angry that I didn't want her to go, or be a member of the team," he added. "She is bad news!"

Congressional Republicans are also taking aim at the testimony presented in today's Jan. 6 hearing.

The Republicans of the House Judiciary Committee called the hearing "a joke," saying Hutchinson's testimony is "all hearsay evidence."

That Twitter account said "lol no one is watching" the hearing, noting the current spike in gas prices across the country.

Republican Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene also chimed in. She questioned why the House Select Committee is not talking about Trump's request for the National Guard to be present on Jan. 6

"Why was [President] Trump's [National Guard] requests denied with all the known intelligence reports leading up to the 6th???" Greene tweeted.

Trump Was Aware Attendees Had Weapons

Former Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe warned that what the White House was pursuing on Jan. 6 could be "dangerous" for Donald Trump's legacy and the state of democracy, Cassidy Hutchinson testified Tuesday.

Ratcliff was apprehensive about Trump's plan to fight the 2020 Presidential election results, Hutchinson said. She recalled Ratcliffe was afraid things would "spiral out of control" on Jan. 6.

There were intelligence reports about members of the Proud Boys attending Trump's rally.

"I remember hearing the word Oath Keeper and Proud Boys closer to the planning of the January 6 rally when [Rudy] Giuliani would be around," Hutchinson said.

Proud Boys Rally
Video from January 6 is played as Cassidy Hutchinson, a top former aide to Trump White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, testifies during the sixth hearing by the House Select Committee on the January 6th insurrection in the Cannon House Office Building on June 28, 2022 in Washington, DC. Anna Moneymaker//Getty Images

On the morning of Jan. 6, Metro and Capitol Police reported people at the rally with a slew of weapons. While those who went to Trump's rally at the Ellipse went through security, the thousands of others who watched from the lawn did not.

Police recordings showed people has guns, including AR-15 rifles, ballistic helmets, body armor and military-grade backpacks.

Tony Ornato, the Assistant Director of the United States Secret Service Office of Training, told former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows at around 10 a.m. on Jan. 6, that people at the rally had several weapons, including knifes, guns and spears, Hutchinson recalled.

When Ornato was relaying this information, Hutchinson said Meadows did not look up from his phone and did not seem concerned. Trump was also not concerned about reports that people were coming through magnetometers with weapons, she said.

weapons at Capitol
An image of rioters is displayed on a screen during the sixth hearing by the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol, in Washington, DC, on June 28, 2022. Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Hutchinson said she overheard the President asking to "let my people in" as they "march to the Capitol after the rally is over."

Trump wanted the attendees inside the official rally space and was aware a number of individuals in the crowd had weapons and was encouraging them to walk down to the Capitol. He also wanted secret service to remove the magnetometers.

Hutchinson testified that Trump said, "I don't f'in care that they have weapons. They're not here to hurt me. Take the f'ing mags away... then they can march to the Capitol."

Hutchinson Was 'Scared' About Jan. 6 Plans

Cassidy Hutchinson testified that she was nervous about the events planned for Jan. 6, 2021.

After a meeting on Jan. 2 between Mark Meadows and Rudy Giuliani, Giuliani told Hutchinson that the 6th was "going to be a great day," she said.

"We're going to the Capitol, it's going to be great," Giuliani told her, adding that then-President Donald Trump was going to be there with members of Congress and is going to "look powerful."

When Hutchinson asked Meadows about what Giuliani just told her, the White House Chief of Staff said, "things might get real, real bad on January 6," she testified.

Hutchinson said that she remembers being apprehensive about the planned rally on Jan. 6.

"That evening was the first moment that I remember feeling scared and nervous for what could happen on January 6," she told the Committee.

Committee Vice Chair Liz Cheney noted that Meadows has avoided testifying before the Committee.

Hutchinson to Share Observations of Trump

Cassidy Hutchinson is expected to share "firsthand observations" of former President Donald Trump's "conduct" on January 6, 2021 while testifying Tuesday before the House Jan. 6 Committee.

Hutchinson, who worked as a top aide for former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, "was in a position to know a great deal about the happenings in the Trump White House," Rep. Liz Cheney said during her opening statement before the select committee Tuesday.

Cheney described Hutchinson as a "familiar face on Capitol Hill" who spoke "daily" with members of Congress, top Trump administration officials, White House lawyers and members of the Secret Service who were based in the White House.

Hutchinson has spoken with the committee four times previously, Cheney noted.

During Tuesday's hearing, those following along "will hear Ms. Hutchinson relate certain firsthand observations of President Trump's conduct on January 6," Cheney said. "You will also hear new information regarding the actions and statements of Mr. Trump's senior advisors that day, including his chief of staff, Mark Meadows, and his White House counsel."

The select committee "will begin to examine evidence bearing on what President Trump and members of the White House staff knew about the prospect for violence on January 6, even before that violence began," Cheney said.

Cassidy Hutchinson testifies
Cassidy Hutchinson, an aide to then-White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, testifies during a House select committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on June 28, 2022. ANDREW HARNIK/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

The Hearing Has Started

The sixth hearing from the House Select Committee investigating Jan. 6 has begun.

This hearing will focus on what was going on in the White House on and before Jan. 6, based on newly obtained information, Committee Chair Bennie Thompson said in his opening statement.

Specifically, the Committee received "detailed information about what the former President and his top aides were doing and saying in those critical hours."

What Happened During the Fifth Hearing

The House Jan. 6 Committee held its fifth and most recent public hearing last week on June 23.

While earlier hearings explored the "pressure campaign" committee members said former President Donald Trump and his team placed on election officials and on former Vice President Mike Pence, the June 23 hearing focused on the ways in which the committee said Trump pressured U.S. Department of Justice officials in an attempt to overturn the 2020 election.

Three witnesses appeared before the committee for last week's hearing: former acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen, former acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue and former assistant Attorney General of the Office of Legal Counsel Steven Engel.

Donoghue told the committee Trump had encouraged Rosen to say the election was "corrupt." The former President later told Donoghue and Rosen that he was considering replacing them with attorney Jeff Clark, Donoghue testified. Donoghue also noted several top department officials were prepared to resign if Trump replaced Rosen with Clark.

The testimony delivered publicly on June 23 and witness testimony gathered earlier by the committee showed that Trump "pressured the Justice Department to act as an arm of his re-election campaign," Committee Chair Bennie Thompson said in his closing statement.

The committee shared a three-minute video recap of last week's hearing on Twitter hours before the sixth public hearing was due to start. Accompanying the video was a brief text recap that read, "Trump's pressure campaign spread to every level of government. During our last hearing, we showed the American people about the pressure he applied to the Department of Justice.

Eric Trump Justified Violence After 'Stolen' Election

One of former President Donald Trump's sons was reportedly not concerned about violence that could arise as a result of the unproven claims of fraud surrounding the 2020 Presidential election, according to British documentarian Alex Holder.

Holder interviewed Trump and his children in the days following the 2020 Presidential election for his film. He recently turned over footage to the House Select Committee investigating Jan. 6.

Holder told The Independent that Eric Trump did not appear to be concerned about any acts of violence that could have been caused by his father's claims that the election was stolen. Trump felt such a response would be justified.

"When I asked Eric about the potential danger of the sort of rhetoric and the sort of belligerence, he felt that it was... fair game in that it... was sort of the equivalent on the other side of the political discourse, or he felt that it was the right thing to do... because the election was stolen," Holder told the British online outlet.

Holder added that he personally thought violence would break out as a result of the Trumps' claims.

"The idea of violence, to me, seemed likely because of the fact that when you tell 75 million people that their vote didn't count, and the person that's telling you that is not just the guy you voted for, but also the incumbent President of the United States, the chance of violence was always there," he said.

Video Shows FBI Seizing John Eastman's Phone

John Eastman said the FBI conducted an "unlawful" seizure of his phone in New Mexico last week, according to a Monday court filing.

The former election attorney for former President Donald Trump has been of particular interest to the House Jan. 6 Committee, which is set to begin its sixth day of public hearings Tuesday afternoon.

In the court filing, Eastman argued the agents' search and seizure of his phone was "unlawful" because their warrant was "overbroad" and violated his Fifth Amendment rights. The filing also said the FBI agents "appeared to be" carrying out their search warrant "at the behest" of the Department of Justice's Office of the Inspector General, which Eastman noted is a department that has not employed him.

The filing requested the return of Eastman's phone "and 'all information' in it, as well as to destroy all copies of any information that has already been retrieved or copied from the device."

Eastman's filing also asked that "any access to the cell phone and its information be stayed until he has a full and fair opportunity to assert and protect his Constitutional rights and the privileged communications of his numerous clients."

The FBI's June 22 interaction with Eastman was caught on video. The video clip spread Monday on social media and was also aired during Fox News' Tucker Carlson Tonight. By Tuesday morning, the clip had been viewed on social media more than 500,000 times.

How to Watch Sixth Jan. 6 Hearing

The sixth hearing from the House Select Committee investigating the events of January 6 will begin this afternoon.

Former aide to White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, Cassidy Hutchinson, is expected to testify.

The hearing is set to begin at 1 p.m. ET. It will stream on all major network and cable news channels, as well as C-SPAN and the Committee's website.

Former Mark Meadows Aide to Testify

Today's surprise hearing will feature a mystery witness, according to the House Select Committee.

Cassidy Hutchinson, the aide to former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, is expected to testify as the surprise witness, according to Punchbowl News.

The Committee said it will "present recently obtained evidence" and receive witness testimony.

While the topic of today's hearing has not been announced, Hutchinson is expected to discuss Republican lawmakers who sought pardons following the riot at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.

In previous hearings, the Committee played video of Hutchinson testifying that Republicans lawmakers asked Donald Trump for pardons before he left office.

Hutchinson named Representatives Mo Brooks, Andy Biggs, Louie Gohmert, Scott Perry, and Marjorie Taylor Greene as those who had requested a pardon after January 6 over their alleged attempts to overturn the results of the 2020 Election.

She added that Rep. Matt Gaetz had been "personally pushing" for a pardon since early December 2020 and that Congressman Jim Jordan had asked about updates in Congressional pardons, but never asked for one himself.

This hearing has been shrouded in secrecy, as the Committee gave only a 24 hour notice that it was happening. The Committee did not announce the witnesses' identity